Kodagu First a Celebration. Positive News, Facts & Achievements about Kodagu, Coorgs and the People of Kodagu – here at Home and Overseas
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    The field marshal’s military philosophy is a useful pointer and guide at this critical juncture in the Valley.

    He knew that they were warm and hospitable if treated with respect and as equals. (Illustration: C R Sasikumar)

    He knew that they were warm and hospitable if treated with respect and as equals. (Illustration: C R Sasikumar)

    An interesting anecdote about a great Indian soldier, Field Marshal K.M. Cariappa, is lodged in my memory since childhood. As a habit, I keep asking questions. I had asked a question about Cariappa Park during my school days. Nobody had an answer till the senior political leader from Baramulla, Sheikh Mohammad Akbar, told me a fascinating story of how he had fulfilled the desire of the people of Baramulla, as chairman of the Town Area Committee, to commemorate Cariappa.

    Once, after chasing the raiders beyond Uri, Cariappa was stopped by a group of people at Baramulla and told that they had suffered a lot due to the absence of food supplies, including salt. It was a puzzling question for the general, as no stocks were available with the army. But he fulfilled his assurance the next day when he visited the old town and distributed flour, rice and salt to the most needy families. He followed this gesture in many ways in various parts of Kashmir. K.S. Thimayya, whom he had put in command of the 19th Infantry Division at Baramulla, followed Cariappa in this regard. Grateful Baramullians named a park after Cariappa and the park exists even today.

    My quest to learn more about Cariappa was deepened when I heard some commanders in Kashmir asserting during the recent turmoil that “yes”, stones would be answered through bullets and pellets. The people of Kashmir feel this attitude has been encouraged after Major Nitin Leetul Gogoi was awarded for using a civilian as a “human shield” in Budgam.

    The Indian army’s history tells us that Cariappa showed great valour as a commander and the success he obtained was squarely his own. But many people in India may not know that apart from his military valour, he employed another natural tool as a workable mechanism to deal with the people all around including the enemy. Reading authors like B.C. Khanduri, J.S. Bindra, S.K. Sinha, L.P. Sen, K.C. Cariappa and others, I came to know of many interesting stories woven around the personality of that great soldier. When I came to know of Cariappa’s Waziristan experience, I was flabbergasted.

    In June 1939, Cariappa was transferred to the 1st Battalion of the Rajput Regiment which became his parent unit. The battalion moved to Waziristan and he had to spend three years there. He was posted Waziristan in 1922 as well.

    In November 1945, Cariappa was finally given command of a brigade. He was posted as commander of the Bannu Frontier Brigade in Waziristan.

    Having served in the NWFP as a young officer, Cariappa was conversant with the terrain as well as the habits of the Pathan tribesmen who lived in the area. He had seen that the British policy of trying to keep them under control by force had not succeeded and he resolved to try a different method. He decided to win the hearts and minds of the tribesmen by extending a hand of friendship. He knew that they were warm and hospitable if treated with respect and as equals.

    One day, while passing through a village, he saw a group of Pathan women carrying pitchers of water. When he found out that they had to fetch water daily from another village, four miles away, he immediately ordered a well to be dug near their own village. He followed this gesture with many similar deeds. The Pathans were overwhelmed and started calling him “Khalifa”. Later, when the region was torn by communal strife, Bannu remained a haven of peace thanks to the goodwill generated by Cariappa. When Jawaharlal Nehru visited Bannu in 1945 as head of the Interim Government, Cariappa organised a public meeting which was attended by all tribal leaders. The next day, when he visited Razmak where another brigade was stationed, Nehru was fired upon by the tribesmen and the visit had to be called off. Nehru was impressed by Cariappa’s leadership qualities and rapport with the tribesmen.

    Veekay’s History Book (Victory of Knowledge Global Publications) tells us an interesting story about Cariappa. “In February 1946, he was appointed Presiding Officer of one of the General Court Martials constituted to try members of the Indian National Army (INA). Before the trial, he visited some of the detention camps, where the prisoners were lodged. He found them full of rancour and hatred against the British for treating them badly and holding them without trial. Cariappa was pained by their plight and wrote to the Adjutant General, requesting him to expedite the trials. He also recommended that some of them such as Shah Nawaz Khan, G.S. Dhillon and P.K. Sehgal should be pardoned. But, when as Chief of the Armed Forces he was to consider the recommendation to accommodate Indian National Army (INA) personnel including Shahnawaz, Dhillon and Sehgal and he refused to take them into the Indian Army, particularly for the reason that they would bring politics into the Army. There was a lot of pressure on him for this and Nehru relented only after Cariappa threatened to resign on this issue.”

    I invested some more time to understand both sides of Cariappa’s character. He was a very tough general when it came to leading the armed forces, as was required by military ethics, and he never compromised his principles.

    B.C. Khanduri, who worked with him as operations staff officer, says in his book Field Marshal K.M. Cariappa; His life and Times that, “Once between Mahura and Uri, he was snipped at from close quarters. He showed no signs of fear while his staff officers perspired.”

    Lt. Col. J.S. Bindra, as intelligence and liaison officer with Cariappa recalls in his book an incident at Srinagar. He says: “The 268 Infantry Brigade was without a commander for a few days. Cariappa informed Army Headquarters to post Brigadier Bikram Singh. He (Bikram Singh) represented to the army that his relations with Bakshi Ghulam Mohammad, the then Deputy PM of J&K, were not too friendly and that Bakshi might create problems for him in his command.Cariappa asked him what else? Then, he told Bikram to put his ego in his pocket and do what he desired him to do. Bikram was in Tithwal by the same night and on the job”.

    The other side of his character is described in Veekay’s History Book: “While Cariappa admonished Thimayya for lighting a cigarette while travelling in an Army vehicle, he asked the driver to stop to allow Thimayya to smoke.”

    Lt. General Sen in his book, Slender was the Thread: Kashmir Confrontation 1947-48, describes another quality which Cariappa possessed and it was his broad-mindedness. He says, “He treated all troops the same and was utterly free of any parochial feelings.” He was best known for his love for the Indian soldier. Troops not only loved him, they worshipped him. But then, he never pardoned if anybody indulged in a crime.

    Cariappa is no more but his philosophy of military leadership is available to us. Many retired and serving generals have emphasised again and again that there is no military solution to the Kashmir dispute. It has to be resolved through methods other than force. I am confident that the spirit of Cariappa’s soldiery would be a better guide at this critical juncture of the Union’s relationship with Kashmir.

    The writer is a senior Congress leader and former Union minister.

    source: http://www.indianexpress.com / The Indian Express / Home> Opinion> Columns / by Saifuddin Soz / October 05th, 2017

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    GrovesKF07sept2017

    Bengaluru :

    The Western Ghats has been plundered over the years, resulting also in progressively hotter summers in Bengaluru. While afforestation efforts to save the Ghats have been on for years, a team of passionate and dedicated Bengalureans is trying a different approach to save the many tree species. They are planting acres-wide groves in private and public lands that fall in the range, for now focussing on Coorg and Wayanad.

    Meera, Rajesh, Sheshadri Ramaswamy, Uma, Anil Panolil Chirikandoth and Dhandapany collectively form Forest First Samithi (FFS) – a society that aims to engage and empower local communities in ecological conservation by educating them about endangered and endemic plant species. What started off as a team of four has today grown into a family with ten permanent members and over 30 volunteers.”FFS is trying to conserve endangered tree species by creating an eco-system where birds, small mammals and insects can also thrive,” says Meera, one of the founders of FFS, adding that the organization was started in 2008, and that most of their early years were spent on learning.

    FFS’ vision for degraded lands in Kodagu started this May, and they have already spoken to local organizations and communities to get them on board. “Since we started work in Kodagu, we have already managed to add 35 species of endangered plants into the groves we worked on, and plan to touch 100 species,” she says, adding that the lands they are focusing on are public spaces ranging between 5 acres and 30 acres.

    Workers in Wayanad grove  Pics courtesy: Meera Rajesh

    Workers in Wayanad grove  Pics courtesy: Meera Rajesh

    How it all started

    FFS started work in the biological hotspot that is Wayanad, where a lot of native tree species have been chopped to give way to silver oak, coffee and teak plantations. Meera says that unless one ventures deep into the forest, it is unlikely you’ll come across any traditional species. “During the summer months, we noticed how trees in Wayanad were being chopped at an alarming rate for timber. That’s when we decided to do something about it. We got involved in a lot of discussions with research organizations and experts on how to go about it, and also spoke to locals to get them involved,” she says.

    Years of hard work and research resulted in the complete transformation of a private farm land in Wayanad, where a section of it was partitioned to create what is called a ‘farm grove’. This grove comprises endemic, endangered tree species, while the rest of the land can be used for economic purposes. By getting farmers and land owners involved in understanding how these endangered species will actually better their crops in terms of soil quality, water retention and pollination, FFS has managed to conserve 100 species of trees in Wayanad.

    source: http://www.newindianexpress.com / The New Indian Express / Home> Cities> Bengaluru / by M Shriya Sharma / Express News Service / September 06th, 2017

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    MonappaScholarshipKF26aug2017

    ‘India and Cambridge university have had an enduring relationship’

    The Pemanda Monappa Scholarship was presented to Rupsa Banerjee, a student of English literature, by the Chief Justice of the Madras High Court Indira Banerjee at a function on Wednesday. Ms. Banerjee will study at the University of Cambridge, U.K.

    Speaking on the occasion, the Chief Justice said studying in an institution like Cambridge broadened the outlook of students.

    Congratulating the student, Chief Justice Banerjee hoped she would imbibe the qualities of Pemanda Monappa.

    She recalled that in 1948, the officer was hand-picked by Sardar Vallabhai Patel to be the Inspector of Police of Hyderabad State despite the fact that they had never met.

    P.M. Belliappa, former IAS officer and managing trustee of the Pemanda Monappa Trust, said the event was a celebration of the values that his late father followed till the very end.

    Helen Pennant, director, Cambridge Trust, said it has been in existence for 30 years. It supports 500 scholars annually, she said. “One in three students at the university comes from outside the U.K.,” she said.

    N. Ravi, Director, Kasturi and Sons Ltd., said the relationship between India and Cambridge had been an enduring one and several Indians, including mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujam, statistician P.C. Mahalanobis, Nobel Prize winner Venky Ramakrishnan and three former Prime Ministers were alumni of Cambridge.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> Cities> Chennai / by Special Correspondent / Chennai – August 03rd, 2017

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    Deputy Commissioner Richard Vincent D’Souza asked the homeless and the siteless to enrol their names with the district administration.

    Chairing a Scheduled Caste/Scheduled Tribe committee meeting at deputy commissioner’s office in Madikeri on Sunday, he said the district administration has a target to provide 1,000 sites to the needy.

    But only 300 have registered their names so far. They need to submit their name, address, ration card and the proof of their residence in any of the districts. He said it has been decided to distribute around 1,000 title deeds to the beneficiaries under 94C. The district in-charge minister will distribute the facilities in a programme to be held in the next month.

    Fisheries department senior assistant director K T Darshan said the families belonging to backward castes have been living in tents in Harangi Backwaters area. They should be provided with sites.

    The deputy commissioner asked the officials to identify the lands for Ambedkar Bhavan in every hobli. The Revenue department officials have been told to identify 25 to 50 gunte land, he said.

    Assistant commissioner Dr Nanjundegowda, district social welfare officer Mayadevi Galagali, ITDP officer Prakash, taluk panchayat executive officer Padnekar and taluk social welfare officer Ramegowda were present.

    Deputy Commissioner Richard Vincent D’Souza asked the homeless and the siteless to enrol their names with the district administration.

    Chairing a Scheduled Caste/Scheduled Tribe committee meeting at deputy commissioner’s office in Madikeri on Sunday, he said the district administration has a target to provide 1,000 sites to the needy.

    But only 300 have registered their names so far. They need to submit their name, address, ration card and the proof of their residence in any of the districts. He said it has been decided to distribute around 1,000 title deeds to the beneficiaries under 94C. The district in-charge minister will distribute the facilities in a programme to be held in the next month.

    Fisheries department senior assistant director K T Darshan said the families belonging to backward castes have been living in tents in Harangi Backwaters area. They should be provided with sites.

    The deputy commissioner asked the officials to identify the lands for Ambedkar Bhavan in every hobli. The Revenue department officials have been told to identify 25 to 50 gunte land, he said.

    Assistant commissioner Dr Nanjundegowda, district social welfare officer Mayadevi Galagali, ITDP officer Prakash, taluk panchayat executive officer Padnekar and taluk social welfare officer Ramegowda were present.

    Deputy Commissioner Richard Vincent D’Souza asked the homeless and the siteless to enrol their names with the district administration.

    Chairing a Scheduled Caste/Scheduled Tribe committee meeting at deputy commissioner’s office in Madikeri on Sunday, he said the district administration has a target to provide 1,000 sites to the needy.

    But only 300 have registered their names so far. They need to submit their name, address, ration card and the proof of their residence in any of the districts. He said it has been decided to distribute around 1,000 title deeds to the beneficiaries under 94C. The district in-charge minister will distribute the facilities in a programme to be held in the next month.

    Fisheries department senior assistant director K T Darshan said the families belonging to backward castes have been living in tents in Harangi Backwaters area. They should be provided with sites.

    The deputy commissioner asked the officials to identify the lands for Ambedkar Bhavan in every hobli. The Revenue department officials have been told to identify 25 to 50 gunte land, he said.

    Assistant commissioner Dr Nanjundegowda, district social welfare officer Mayadevi Galagali, ITDP officer Prakash, taluk panchayat executive officer Padnekar and taluk social welfare officer Ramegowda were present.

    source: http://www.deccanherald.com / Deccan Herald / Home> District / by DH News Service, Madikeri / July 17th, 2017

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    Dubai :

    Kodagu Dakshina Kannada Gowda Samaja successfully concluded their annual ‘Blood Donation Campaign’ on Friday June 30 from 10 am to 3 pm at Sheikha Latifa Hospital, Dubai participated by very many members of the Sangha and friends.

    As the requirement of blood is very much essential during Ramadan, the active members of the Sangha from Ajman, Sharjah, Dubai& Abu Dhabi voluntarily came forward in large numbers and donated blood for a good cause.

    KodaguGowdaKF11jul2017

    Founder President Ashok Uluvarna, Past President Ganesh Achhandira, Harish Kodi, Vice President Sunil Mottemane, General Secretary Kanneriyan Sunil Kumar, and TreasurerDilipUluvaru, were present during the campaign supporting the donors. Also present were Navin Gowda of Vokkalikgara Sangha, Dr. Nanda Kishore & Dr. Rashmi Nandakishore of Riva Laser Beauty and Spa & Dr. TrilokChandrashekar of Medi Clinic Hospital, Abu Dhabi who all participated in the blood donation campaign.

    Rahul Bidappa, Ashish Kodi, AyushKodi, Meena Harish Kodi&JagadishKushalappa ably volunteered the campaign helping the donors in registering and completing the formalities. All those participated in the campaign were served with light refreshments, tea, coffee, fruits & juices by KusumadaraKodi, Ashok Ullvarana, ChandrakantKudwaje, Suresh Kumpala, SubramanyaKadikadka, Yathish Gowda, DilipUluvaru, SamarthaBantwal& Vinod Ramachandra who also sponsored the event.

    Roshan Kampala& Praveen Kalagadge were responsible for the campaign while BalaSalian took charge of the programme.

    source: http://www.daijiworld.com / DaijiWorld.com / Home> Middle East / by Shodhan Prasad / Wednesday – July 05th, 2017

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    Rohan Bopanna clinched his maiden Grand Slam title when he won the French Open mixed doubles final with Canada’s Gabriela Dabrowski in Paris on Thursday.

    Canada's Gabriela Dabrowski and India's Rohan Bopanna hold aloft the trophy after winning the French Open mixed doubles title in Paris on Thursday. The pair defeated Germany’s Anna-Lena Groenefeld and Colombian Robert Farah 2-6, 6-2 (12-10). (AP)

    Canada’s Gabriela Dabrowski and India’s Rohan Bopanna hold aloft the trophy after winning the French Open mixed doubles title in Paris on Thursday. The pair defeated Germany’s Anna-Lena Groenefeld and Colombian Robert Farah 2-6, 6-2 (12-10). (AP)

    Indian tennis ace Rohan Bopanna and Canadian partner Gabriela Dabrowski produced a fighting performance to beat their German-Colombian opponents Anna-Lena Groenefeld and Robert Farah in the final to clinch their maiden French Open mixed doubles title in Paris on Thursday.

    Seeded seventh, Bopanna and Dabrowski took an hour and six minutes to win, saving two match points, as they overcame the unseeded Groenefeld and Farah 2-6, 6-2, 12-10 on Philippe-Chatrier Court.

    Bopanna has become only the fourth Indian to win a Grand Slam crown, after Leander Paes, Mahesh Bhupathi and Sania Mirza. Indians have accounted for 20 Grand Slam mixed doubles titles. Two of those victories belong solely to India with Sania Mirza partnering Mahesh Bhupathi.

    Bopanna entered the final of a Grand Slam tournament after a gap of seven years. He had also qualified for a Major final in 2010 when he and Pakistan partner Aisam-ul-haq Qureshi entered the title clash of the US Open.

    The 16th seeds had then lost to American twins Bob and Mike Bryan in the final.

    Bopanna is the also the fourth Indian to win a mixed doubles crown at the world’s premier clay court tournament. Bhupathi won India’s first Grand Slam title in 1997 when he partnered Japan’s Rika Hiraki to claim the French Open.

    Bhupathi again won in 2012, this time with compatriot Sania Mirza.

    Paes too had savoured glory on the red clay when he won in 2016 with Martina Hingis.

    Bopanna and Dabrowski did not start well, losing the first set 2-6. The seventh seeds gave away as many as four breakpoint chances and Groenefeld and Farah converted two to take the lead in the match.

    However, the Indian-Canadian combine fought back well to clinch the second set with the same scoreline.

    Though they were broken once, Bopanna and Dabrowski converted three of the five breakpoint opportunities they got to push the match into a match tie-break (earlier known as Super Tie-Break).

    The German-Colombian pair led throughout the tie-break, and held two match points at 9-7. However, Bopanna and Dabrowski somehow managed to save both.

    Bopanna and Dabrowski had their first chance when they took the lead at 10-9. They lost the opportunity as scores were levelled at 10-all but the pair grabbed the next two points to seal victory at Roland Garros.

    source: http://www.hindustantimes.com / Hindustan Times / Home> Tennis / HT Correspondent, Hindustan Times / June 08th, 2017

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    Youths being trained for defence forces in Kushalnagar | Express

    Youths being trained for defence forces in Kushalnagar | Express

    Madikeri :

    Service to the nation appears to be in the DNA of Kodagu people. In the district known for brave warriors, some servicemen continue to serve the defence forces after their retirement too — by grooming prospective soldiers.

    The Kushalnagar Ex-servicemen’s Association has been providing rigorous training to youths aspiring to join the defence forces for the last 10 years.

    To join military, youngsters of Kodagu may not need a greater motivation than the profile of the district which has produced a field marshal, a general, many lieutenant generals and thousands of soldiers. A number of villages of the district have more than 10 serving or retired servicemen. Often, one can see 2-3 brothers serving the defence forces.

    Ironically, Kodagu lacks a training institute to help youths join the military.

    In 2007, the Kushalnagar association decided to fill the void. It started training sessions at government primary schools for those keen on joining the Army. Since then it has trained at least 2,000 youngsters.

    The rigorous exercises include 2-km running, zigzag running, long jump, high jump, push-ups, yoga and meditation.

    The training also means hard work for association president M N Monnappa and other office-bearers like A Janardhana, N S Suresh Kumar, Bojappa and Somanna.

    As the exercises have to be completed before school hours, they have to be at the venues by 5.30 am. They spend at least two hours, till 7.30 am, with military-aspiring youths.

    But physical fitness alone is not enough to join the defence forces. They have to pass written tests too which many aspirants find difficult. The association has addressed the need and holds coaching.

    Janardhana says the training is free of cost and “we never expected a penny from the youths.

    “The number of trainees sees a spike during job openings in defence, police, CRPF and other forces,” he observes.

    According to trainer Naresh Kumar, the association provides information to youths when recruitments take place. “Hundreds have joined defence forces after training here,” says Naresh. He can be contacted on 9480640924.

    source: http://www.newindianexpress.com / The New Indian Express / Home> States> Karnataka / by Coovercolly Indresh / Express News Service / May 28th, 2017

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    Role Models: Paintings of General K S Thimayya, Field Marshal K M Cariappa.

    Role Models: Paintings of General K S Thimayya, Field Marshal K M Cariappa.

    Kodagu is not just known for its serene landscape and picturesque surroundings, but also for the valour of its people. Rightly, the district boasts of several military heroes. The statues of such brave men can be seen in Madikeri. The Sudarshan Circle in Madikeri is flanked by the statue of Field Marshal K M Cariappa and the equestrian statue of Subedar Guddemane Appayya Gowda.

    One of the earliest revolutionaries from Kodagu, Appayya Gowda, was hanged by the British in 1837. His contemporary revolutionaries from Kodagu included Subedar Naalnaad Mandira Uthayya, Chetty Kudiya and Shanthalli Mallayya who were imprisoned for many years by the British. Further along the main road, you can see a circle with the statue of General K S Thimayya. If you take the deviation to the right, you will find Major M C Muthanna Circle near the town hall and Squadron Leader A B Devaiah Circle near the private bus stand.

    The first family

    In Kunda, near Gonikoppal, lived the Kodandera family, hereditary chieftains of a group of villages. I M Muthanna’s Coorg Memoirs mentions that Naad Parupatyagar (native village official) Kodandera Kuttayya was the grandson of Diwan Mandepanda Thimmaiah. Between 1901 and 1909, he was the assistant commissioner and highest ranked native official in the then Coorg province. When his wife Dechy, or Dechamma, passed away, a locality in Madikeri was named as Dechur in her memory.

    Two members of this family, Field Marshal Kodandera Madappa Cariappa and General Kodandera Subayya Thimayya, rose to become the chiefs of the Indian Army. Hence, the Kodandera family came to be considered as the first family of Kodagu’s military heroes. Field Marshal Cariappa was the son of Kuttayya’s younger brother Madappa, who worked in the revenue department. General Thimayya was the grandson of Kuttayya.

    Born in 1899, Field Marshal Cariappa, ‘the Grand Old Man of the Indian Army’, studied in the Madikeri Government Central High School and then in the Madras Presidency College. He gained admission at Daly Cadet College, Indore, in 1919 and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in Bombay’s 88th Carnatic Infantry, during World War I. The following year, he served in Mesopotamia (Iraq) and was promoted as a lieutenant.

    He became the first Indian army officer to attend the Staff College in Quetta. He married Muthu Machia, a forest officer’s daughter, had a son K C Nanda Cariappa, who later rose to the rank of air marshal, and a daughter, Nalini. During World War II, Cariappa was awarded the Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE). He became the first Indian to become a brigadier.

    Cariappa also served as India’s first commander-in-chief (C-in-C) between 1949 and 1953. Now this position rests with the President of India. He represented India as its high commissioner in Australia and New Zealand from 1953 to 1956. In 1986, he was made a field marshal. Thus, he became one of the two Indian army officers to hold this rank. He died in 1993.

    General Thimayya’s actual name was Subayya, while Thimayya was his father’s name. He was born in Madikeri in 1906. Admitted to the then Prince of Wales Military College in Dehradun, he was one of the six Indian cadets who underwent training in Royal Military College, Sandhurst, England. In 1926, he was commissioned into the Indian army. In 1935, he married Codanda Nina and the couple went to Quetta. During the Quetta earthquake that year the couple rendered outstanding humanitarian service.

    During World War II, Thimayya was awarded Distinguished Service Order (DSO). He represented India during the Japanese surrender. Between 1953 and 1955, Thimayya was the chairman of the Neutral Nations Repatriation Commission. He gained international fame for the way he handled the exchange of the prisoners of war (POWs) held during the Korean War. In 1954, he was awarded the Padma Bhushan. Between 1957 and 1961, he was the chief of the Indian army.

    In 1964, he was appointed Commander of the United Nations Forces in Cyprus, where he passed away. Cyprus released a stamp in his memory, and later, his wax statue was displayed in Singapore. Both Cariappa and Thimayya are iconic figures in India.

    Fond memories

    According to Major General Arjun Muthanna, a great grandson of Kuttayya, Cariappa and Thimayya belonged to a generation of Indian officers who stormed the bastion of India’s colonial masters and deftly navigated unchartered situations. Both had huge responsibilities thrust upon them at a relatively young age and rose to the challenge. Cariappa, commissioned as a lieutenant when Indians were just being permitted to become British Indian Army officers, would ‘Outbritish the British’, probably to be accepted and treated as an equal by the British officers.

    A strict disciplinarian, he demanded punctuality and proper dress code. He was fiercely nationalistic and moulded the Indian Army into its current apolitical position.

    In 1948, the Kashmir situation grew tense and war was imminent. Lieutenant General Cariappa became the head of the Western Command and led Lieutenant General S M Shrinagesh and Major General Thimayya. It was during this war that Thimayya helped India secure Ladakh.

    Cariappa’s contemporary and friend, Lieutenant General Nathu Singh, was first offered the post of C-in-C but he declined and stated that his senior Cariappa, who won the 1948 war for India, was more eligible for the post. It was on January 15, 1949 that the three centuries old colonial army became a national army. That was the first time an Indian, General Cariappa, was made chief of the Indian armed forces.

    Every morning, Cariappa paid his respects to the portrait of his parents and the statue of a jawan. He was ever thankful to the soldiers for protecting the country. Hence, he was called the soldiers’ general. Cariappa would go to the war front, even after retirement, in order to motivate the troops.

    Muthanna narrates a personal anecdote about the Field Marshal, “When I called on him at his residence, in Madikeri, in May 1986, to invite him for my wedding, I was wearing a half sleeve shirt and trousers as appropriate for the hot summer day. After accepting the invitation, he commented on my attire saying ‘You’re an officer in the army aren’t you? In which case, you should be wearing a coat and tie.’ I had no response and thought in my mind I’m calling on my family elder. Pat came his next comment, as if he’d read my mind, ‘In case you’re calling on me as a relative you should be wearing our traditional dress of kupya.’ He walked the talk. He was always dressed formally as a respect to the person who was visiting him.”

    Thimayya was charismatic, approachable and had great interpersonal skills. When Thimayya visited his Dehradun alma mater as an alumni, one of the cadets there wanted to know how to address the general. Thimayya simply replied ‘Call me Timmy’, referring to his nickname!

    Some of the other military heroes of Kodagu are: Major Mangerira Chinnappa Muthanna, who was awarded the Shaurya Chakra posthumously, and Squadron Leader Ajjamada Bopayya Devaiah, nicknamed ‘Wings of Fire’, the only Air Force personnel to be awarded the Maha Vir Chakra posthumously so far.

    source: http://www.deccanherald.com / Deccan Herald / Home> Supplements> Spectrum / Mookonda Kushalappa / May 22nd, 2017

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    She’s a hardcore advocate of tribal rights, who, as the government have realised to their cost, will not back down.

    Tribal leader Muthamma climbs a tree in support of her demands at Diddalli in Kodagu on Thursday

    Tribal leader Muthamma climbs a tree in support of her demands at Diddalli in Kodagu on Thursday

    Mysuru:

    Muthamma, the woman who transfixed her supporters and critics by shedding her clothes to lead a protest, parading stark naked against the unfair treatment meted out to the tribals of Kodagu, is no exhibitionist. She’s a hardcore advocate of tribal rights, who, as the government have realised to their cost, will not back down.

    “It is not easy for a woman to remove her clothes and march nude in public. But it was my intense agony for my people and anger over the injustice they had suffered that forced me to opt for such a protest,” says 48- year-old Muthamma, who is leading the tribals camping in Diddalli in their fight for housing sites and land to farm on.

    A video of her nude march to protest the tribals’ eviction from Diddalli in December last year had gone viral on social media. Married to Basappa, a daily wage worker, Muthamma has four children and her younger brother, Appaji is a GP member.

    “As a child I was deeply pained to see my own parents moving from one place to another after they were removed from the forests. But they did not give up and go to line houses in coffee plantations. Instead they ensured that I studied till class 10. Later the Union government made me part of the Mahila Samukya, where I trained in empowering women and motivating them to have an education. In 1993, I was elected a GP member, but my hands were tied and I couldn’t do much to help my people,” she recalls. Although her parents finally settled in Channanakote in Diddalli, the family got land rights only in 2008 after a prolonged battle with the government.

    “Although there are 200 of us in Channanakote, only 30 have got land rights. I was shocked to hear about our Diddalli tribals living in line houses in plantations in Kodagu being treated as bonded labourers. I was an Aasha health worker, but gave up that job to lead their protest,” she reveals, adding, “I am not part of any NGO, but just another daily wage worker fighting for justice for my people.”

    source: http://www.deccanchronicle.com / Deccan Chronicle / Home> Nation> Current Affairs / by Shilpa P / May 06th, 2017

  • scissors

    As many as 306 teams have enrolled for the prestigious Kodava family hockey tournament scheduled to begin here on Monday. With Biddatanda family hosting this edition of the annual tournament, the event is named Biddatanda Hockey Namme-2017.

    The hockey festival, in its 21st year, promises to a treat for hockey buffs with a record number of teams are vying for the top prize. The tournament has produced fine talents over the years some of whom have made the cut into state and national teams. The matches will be played at three grounds – two at Gen Thimayya Stadium at Cheriyaparambu, and at Govt PU College ground.

    Grounds Committee chairman B B Belyappa said, “Final touches are being given to the grounds to make them match-ready at a cost of Rs 16 lakh. The 27-day tournament is being organised at a cost of Rs 1.6 crore.”

    Thunder showers, in the recent past, in the run up to the competition have delayed the preparations. With rain taking a break on Saturday, the groundsmen took up the last-minute preparations to make the grounds ready for the matches, starting on Monday.

    For the first time in the history of the tournament, a metal gallery has been erected for the benefit of the spectators. The organisers have also made necessary arrangements like mats, sound system, lighting, media gallery at a cost of Rs 33.50 lakh.

    As many as waterproof make-shift food stalls have been set up at the grounds. Safety measures are also in place with shade nets covering the banks of Cauvery river to prevent people from venturing into water and contaminating the same.

    Mysuru-Kodagu MP Pratap Simha had promised Rs 30 lakh from his MPLAD funds for the tournament but released only Rs 20 lakh. Zilla Panchayat is also expected to chip in with Rs 4 lakh for building a check wall.

    MLC Shantheyanda Veena Achaiah has sanctioned Rs 5 lakh. Legislators K G Bopaiah and MLC Suneel Subramani too have promised funds.

    Hockey India, Hockey Karnataka, Hockey Kodagu and Umpire Association have extended their support to the event. President of Umpire Association Katumaniyanda Umesh has taken over the mantle of supervising the matches.

    According to technical director of Biddatanda Hockey Namme B S Thammaiah, seating facilities have been made for 20,000 people. It includes 4,000 seats for VIPs. Parking facilities have been made on 15 acres of land.

    Hockey Olympian Anjaparavanda B Subbaiah will inaugurate the tournament on April 17 at 10.30 am. Founder of Hockey Namme, Pandanda M Kuttappa, will be the chief guest, while Prof B C Ponnappa of Biddatanda clan will preside over the inaugural function.

    Revenue Minister Kagodu Thimmappa, Forest Minister B Ramanath Rai, former minister M C Nanaiah, MP Prathap Simha, MLAs K G Bopaiah and Appachu Ranjan, MLCs Shantheyanda Veena Achaiah and Suneel Subramani, SP P Rajendra Prasad, president of Kodagu Hockey Association Pykera Kalaiah and Muliya Prasad from Muliya Foundation are also expected to attend the inaugural session.

    source: http://www.deccanherald.com / Deccan Herald / Home> District / DH News Service / Napoklu – April 16th, 2017

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