Kodagu First a Celebration. Positive News, Facts & Achievements about Kodagu, Coorgs and the People of Kodagu – here at Home and Overseas
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    Kannada and Culture Minister Umashree on Monday said that work on construction of General Thimayya Museum in Kodagu will be completed by March next year, before his birth anniversary.

    Replying to S Veena Achaiah (Cong), who sought to know the reason for the construction work being very slow, in the Legislative Council, she said the land where the museum is being built was owned by Transport department. There was some delay in transferring the land to the Kannada and Culture department. So the construction work was going in slow pace, she added.

    The minister said the department has now expedited the work, and it will be completed by March next year.

    Earlier, Veena Achaiah said the government had sanctioned Rs 5.50 crore for General Thimayya Museum in 2013. So far, only Rs 45 lakh has been utilised. Works should be expedited and state government should ensure that the museum works are completed by March. It should be inaugurated by March 21, birth anniversary of General Thimayya, she added.

    To another question by Jayamala of Congress on installing the statue of former chief minister K C Reddy at Vidhana Soudha, Umashree said the government is unable to do so because of the Supreme Court order.
    She, however, added that an appropriate decision will be taken after holding a meeting with Chief Minister Siddaramaiah in this regard.

    source: http://www.deccanherald.com / Deccan Herald / Home> State / DH News Service, Belagavi / November 20th, 2017

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    KM Cariappa received the prestigious order of the British Empire (OBE) for his role in the Burma against the Japanese during the Second World War.

    Army Chief General Bipin Rawat on Saturday pitched for Field Marshal Kodandera Madappa Cariappa, independent India’s first army chief, to be conferred the Bharat Ratna. However, few know of the man whose unrelenting patriotism and secular beliefs blazed a trail in the Indian Army.

    KM Cariappa is a man known for many firsts, but most importantly, he is known as the man who took charge of the Indian Army from its last British Commander in Chief, General Sir Roy Bucher. Born on January 28, 1899, in Coorg, Cariappa completed his education at Central High School at Madikeri and went on to study at the Presidency College in Madras.

    However, Cariappa began his Army stint under the British and was among the few selected for the first batch of KCIOs (King’s Commissioned Indian Officers) at the Daly Cadet College in Indore and was commissioned in the Carnatic Infantry. He was in active service with the 37 (Prince of Wales) Dogra in Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq) and then posted to the 2nd Rajput Light Infantry (Queen Victoria’s Own). Cariappa went on to become the first Indian officer to undergo the course at Staff College, Quetta in 1933. In 1946, he got promoted as the Brigadier of the Frontier Brigade Group.

    By Indian independence, Cariappa saw action in Iraq, Syria, Iran and Burma and became the first Indian Officer to be given command of a unit in 1942. He went on to receive many awards and accolades in his career spanning three decades. He received the prestigious order of the British Empire (OBE) for his role in the Burma against the Japanese during the Second World War.

    In 1947, Cariappa became the first Indian to be selected to undergo a training course at Imperial Defence College, Camberly, UK. His role during the Partition is rarely mentioned, during which he oversaw the division of the Army. Cariappa also led the Indian forces on the Western Front during the Indo-Pak War of 1947 and successfully recaptured Zojila, Drass and Kargil and established a linkup with Leh.

    On January 15, 1949, Cariappa became the first Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Army. He held the five-star rank of field marshal, the highest honour in the Indian Army, which Sam Manekshaw is the only other officer to have held. He was also awarded the ‘Order of the Chief Commander of the Legion of Merit’ by US President, Harry Truman
    Even after his retirement from the Army in 1953, Cariappa was not finished yet and served as the High Commissioner to Australia and New Zealand till 1956. He died in Bengaluru in 1993 at the age of 94.

    With PTI inputs

    source: http://www.indianexpress.com / The Indian Express / Home> Who Is / by Express Web Desk / New Delhi – November 04th, 2017

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    Gen Rawat’s comments came in response to a request by Col KC Subbayya from The Field Marshal Cariappa General Thimayya (FMCGT) forum about recommending the Bharat Ratna to Cariappa, who hails from Kodagu district in Karnataka.

    File photo of Army chief General Bipin Rawat. (PTI)

    File photo of Army chief General Bipin Rawat. (PTI)

    Gonikoppal:

    Army Chief General Bipin Rawat on Saturday pitched for conferring the country’s highest civilian honour Bharat Ratna on independent India’s first army chief, Field Marshal General K M Cariappa.

    “The time has also come to recommend Field Marshal Cariappa for the award of Bharat Ratna. If others can get it, I see no reason why he should not, a deserving personality for the same. We will shortly address the issue on priority,” he said

    Gen Rawat’s comments came in response to a request by Col KC Subbayya from The Field Marshal Cariappa General Thimayya (FMCGT) forum about recommending the Bharat Ratna to Cariappa, who hails from Kodagu district in Karnataka.

    Rawat unveiled the statues of Cariappa and General K S Thimayya, also a former Army chief who hailed from Kodagu district in Karnataka, at a function at the Cauvery College at Gonikoppal, Kodagu district.

    Former Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Military, Field Marshal Kodandera Madappa Cariappa (1899 - 1993), 1975. (Photo by Dinodia Photos/Getty Images)

    Former Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Military, Field Marshal Kodandera Madappa Cariappa (1899 – 1993), 1975. (Photo by Dinodia Photos/Getty Images)

    Terming Kodagu (formerly Coorg) as a ‘land of warriors’, Rawat said he is proud, privileged and humbled for having got the opportunity to unveil the memorial in memory of Field Marshal Cariappa and General K S Thimayya.

    Kodagu continues to serve the nation with a large number of officers and men serving the Army, he said and voiced hope that “there will be more Chiefs in the future who will rise from this great land”.

    Cariappa was the first Indian Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Army and was conferred the rank of Field Marshal on April 28, 1986.

    He was also a recipient of the prestigious order of the British Empire (OBE) for his role in the Burma campaign against the Japanese during the Second World War.

    Cariappa also led the Indian forces on the Western Front during the Indo-Pak War of 1947.

    He held the five-star rank of field marshal, the highest honour in the Indian Army, which Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw is the only other officer to have held.

    Cariappa, whose military career spanned over three decades, retired from the Army in 1953 and later served as the High Commissioner to Australia and New Zealand till 1956.

    He died in Bengaluru in 1993 at the age of 94.

    source: http://www.news18.com / News18.com / Home> India / PTI / November 04th, 2017

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    Chief of the Army Staff General Bipin Rawat will unveil statues of Field Marshal K.M. Cariappa and General K.S. Thimayya at a function in Cauvery College, Gonikoppal, Kodagu district, on Saturday.

    The history of valour in the Indian Army is incomplete without mention of Kodavas, and amongst them Field Marshal Cariappa, and General Thimayya stand out as shining examples of leadership and inspiration, a press release said. Field Marshal Cariappa was the first Indian Commander in Chief of the Indian Army and was conferred the rank of Field Marshal on April 28, 1986. He was also a recipient of the Order of the British Empire for his role in the Burma campaign against the Japanese during World War 2. General Thimayya was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 1954 and took over as Army Chief on May 7, 1957.

    The site for the statues — located close to the ‘lyn house’, the ancestral house of the Kodavdira family belonging to the Generals — has been provided by the Cauvery Educational Society. The bronze statues (7’6” in height) were crafted in Bidadi by Shilpi Vijay for a cost of ₹17 lakh. This is the only location in India where statues of Army Chiefs stand next to one another.

    The Field Marshal Cariappa General Thimayya Forum has been formed with the aim of helping veterans and motivating youngsters to join the armed forces. The forum started celebrating the birth anniversaries of the Generals in 2007, and today, Field Marshal Cariappa’s birth anniversary has become a government event.

    Efforts are on to do the same for Gen Thimayya’s birth anniversary as well. The forum is also actively involved in turning ‘Sunny Side’, which was Gen. Thimayya’s residence, into a museum and war memorial. According to the release, the plan is to complete the work by mid-2018.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Karnataka / by Special Correspondent / Mysuru – November 01st, 2017

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    Chief of the Army staff General Bipin Rawat will honour the Kodava martial warriors and unveil statues of First Field Marshal of Indian Army K M Cariappa and Padma Bhushan General K S Thimayya on November 4 at Gonikoppal in Kodagu district on November 4.

    Field Marshal Cariappa is also a recipient of the prestigious order of the British Empire (OBE) for his role in the Burma campaign against the Japanese during the 2nd World War. General Thimayya, was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 1954 and took over as Chief of the Indian Army on 7 May, 1957.

    The site for the statues has been provided by the Cauvery Educational Society and is located in close vicinity to the ‘lyn house’, the ancestral house of Kodavdira family belonging to theGenerals. The two statues are placed side by side about 25′ above the road level.

    The bronze statues, 7’6″ in height have been made in Bidadi by Shilpi Vijay at a total cost of Rs 17 lakhs. This is the only LoC in India where statues of the Army Chiefs are Co-located.

    The Field Marshal Cariappa General Thimayya forum was formed with the aim of helpingthe veterans of the area and to motivate youngsters to join the Defence Forces.

    The two bronze statues will be unveiled in presence of Lt General R K Anand, General Officer Commanding, Dakshin Bharat Area, Major General K S Nijjar, General Officer Commanding, Karnataka & Kerala Sub Area.UNI MSP AE1323

    — (UNI) — C-1-1-DL0100-1112494.Xml
    source: http://www.news.webindia123.com / WebIndia123 / Home> News> India / Bengaluru – Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

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    After losing out to the British, the Haleri royal family moved to Periyapatna and later to Mysuru city where they settled at Shivrampete.

    Madikeri Palace is in a shambles now

    Madikeri Palace is in a shambles now

    Centuries ago, the battlefields of Coorg thundered with their war cry as they took on marauding armies of the invader, sowing the seeds for a martial race which continues to amaze the world with its heroism and audacity. But the days of the dynasty and the royals are long gone and the kings of Coorg, like everyone else, now have to contend with the rigours of a modern age where democracy, the great leveller, makes sure everyone has to toil for his bread. Some dynasties have switched to politics with remarkable success , others preferred a life as ordinary as it could be, sacrificing their vast tracts of lands, palaces, forts and the antiques of their forefathers. M.B. Girish profiles the Coorg royal dynasty which once ruled from Madikeri and now runs a flour-mill and a chilli powder shop in the busy Shivarampete of Mysuru city

    It has been a remarkable journey for the family members of HCN Wodeyar, the king of Madikeri, one finds it hard to believe that here sitting before you, are the descendants of a royal family. Except for a huge pile of documents gathered from the authorities concerned, HCN Wodeyar no longer has the antiques left behind by his forefathers nor does he lead a lavish lifestyle which could remind people that his family once held sway over Madikeri.

    MadikeriRoyal02KF30oct2017

    For more than a century, the family has been running a flour mill attached to a store selling masala powder and flour on the busy Vinoba road in Shivrampete. Sachida nanada Hittina Angadi (flour shop) as it is known, has history written all over it-on the walls of the store, one can spot a couple of portraits of royal family members. An inquisitive visitor who ventures to ask whose portraits they are, would get an answer that the store is run by descendants of the Haleri Ursu Royal Family who once ruled Kodagu.

    Not many know that the store now belongs to Haleri Chinnanna Nagaraju Wodeyar (75), the King of the Princely State of Kodagu and was started by his father Chinnanna. The lineage of the Haleri royal family starts with Veera Raja who ruled from 1600 AD and was succeeded by Appaji Raja and later Muddu Raja who ruled the region from 1633 AD to1687 AD. The rulers belonged to the Banajiga Lingayat community.

    HCN Wodeyar and (right) his flour mill in Mysuru

    HCN Wodeyar and (right) his flour mill in Mysuru

    HCN Wodeyar tracing the history of the royal family, says his great grandfather Haleri Mallappa was married to queen Devammaji and he is the son of Chinnanna and the heir of the erstwhile royal family of Madikeri. Devammaji ruled the place for two years from 1809-11 before Britishers took control of the region.

    To support his claim that he is the true heir, HCN has maintained various records issued by different authorities on the family tree of his erstwhile royal family. When asked about the decline of his family, HCN turns emotional and says, “everything is gone.”

    After the Britishers started making inroads into the Princely States in India one after the other, his royal family too became a victim of British rule and gave away the kingdom which once stretched from Kushalanagar to Mangaluru. “Our great grandfathers, mainly Dodda Veera Raja traded in lemon, tobacco, oranges among others which were sent to markets in Kerala and Delhi in those days,” he recalls.

    After losing out to the British, the Haleri royal family moved to Doddabeedi in Periyapatna and later shifted to Mysuru city where they settled at Shivrampete.

    The royals-turned business family now stays at Chamaraja Mohalla where a board in Kannada at the entrance facing the road, states, “HCN Wodeyar is the owner of Madikeri Palace.”

    The Palace of the Haleri royal family was built during the rule of Muddu Raja and later modified during British rule. Though his kingdom has disappeared, HCN longs to regain ownership of Madikeri Palace, situated on 77 acres at Karnangeri and is engaged in a legal battle since 1998. “The palace is in a dilapidated condition and if the structure is given to me, repairs will be taken up to restore its past glory,” he says.

    HCN first got to see his ancestral palace when he was a child. “My father took me to the palace for the first time and since then, I have visited the palace about 15 times,” he says.

    At Chamaraja Mohalla, he lives in a small tiled house with his wife, sons and grandchildren. His grandchildren play on the wooden sofas while wife Sowbhagya attends to domestic chores with her daughters-in-law.

    The family no longer has the royal antiques such as swords, spearhead, royal seals and royal attire. “A throne was taken away by the British among other precious items,” laments the Haleri king. Just then, HCN’s grandson Milind (13) brings out a lone sword from the room and flaunts it.

    Though he no longer lives in Madikeri in the palace, HCN says people still hold the royal family in high esteem. Milind, a class 8 student at JSS Public School says, “My classmates and teachers are aware that I hail from a royal family.” As many as 70 types of masala powders are sold at the shop- both vegetarian and non-vegetarian. There are people like Prakash, a resident of Hassan, who says he is surprised to know that the flour shop is run by the Coorg royal family and recalls that he has walked by the shop on a number of occasions but had no idea about the history of the family running it.

    Not many have been able to make the transition from royalty to a democratic way of living smoothly, many have struggled and fallen into bad times. It has not been easy for the Coorg royal family either for the times have changed but then they have risen to the challenge in the hope of a better morrow. Nor would the Coorgis like to forget the Haleri royal family for they bring back memories of the times of the kings, of grandeur and magnificence which no ordinary mortal can match.

    source: http://www.deccanchronicle.com / Deccan Chronicle / Home> Naton – In Other News / by MB Girish / October 29th, 2017

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    October 28th, 2017adminEducation, Leaders, Sports

    ShorinKarateKF28oct2017

    Mysuru :

    The 15th Shorin Kai National Karate Championship was inaugurated in the city at Gymnastics Hall, Sports Pavilion, University of Mysore, here on Saturday.

    Chamaraja Constituency MLA Vasu and journalist Ravi Koti inaugurated the championship.

    The Kata bout of the tournament was inaugurated by Dr P Krishnaiah, director of physical education, University of Mysore and B G Kumar, In-charge Deputy SP, Lokayuktha, Chamarajanagar.

    Shanthi Achappa, chairperson, National Academy School, Gonikoppal
    and Rev Fr George K V, principal, Pushpa Convent School, were the guests of honour.

    Former corporator Sunand Kumar R, Shihan N G Shivadas, AKF Judge; Shihan Shankara, AKF Judge; Sensei Deepak Kumar, Secretary Mysore Karate Association and T K Sukumaran, president, organising committee and others were present.

    The two-day national championship organised by Okinawa Karate-Do Shorin Ryu Shorin Kai Association India will see participation from more than 750 karatekas from Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, West Bengal and hosts Karnataka. The tournament will be held in different belt categories based on age groups.

    source: http://www.citytoday.news / City Today / Home> Headlines> Mysore / CT Bureau / October 28th, 2017

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    The field marshal’s military philosophy is a useful pointer and guide at this critical juncture in the Valley.

    He knew that they were warm and hospitable if treated with respect and as equals. (Illustration: C R Sasikumar)

    He knew that they were warm and hospitable if treated with respect and as equals. (Illustration: C R Sasikumar)

    An interesting anecdote about a great Indian soldier, Field Marshal K.M. Cariappa, is lodged in my memory since childhood. As a habit, I keep asking questions. I had asked a question about Cariappa Park during my school days. Nobody had an answer till the senior political leader from Baramulla, Sheikh Mohammad Akbar, told me a fascinating story of how he had fulfilled the desire of the people of Baramulla, as chairman of the Town Area Committee, to commemorate Cariappa.

    Once, after chasing the raiders beyond Uri, Cariappa was stopped by a group of people at Baramulla and told that they had suffered a lot due to the absence of food supplies, including salt. It was a puzzling question for the general, as no stocks were available with the army. But he fulfilled his assurance the next day when he visited the old town and distributed flour, rice and salt to the most needy families. He followed this gesture in many ways in various parts of Kashmir. K.S. Thimayya, whom he had put in command of the 19th Infantry Division at Baramulla, followed Cariappa in this regard. Grateful Baramullians named a park after Cariappa and the park exists even today.

    My quest to learn more about Cariappa was deepened when I heard some commanders in Kashmir asserting during the recent turmoil that “yes”, stones would be answered through bullets and pellets. The people of Kashmir feel this attitude has been encouraged after Major Nitin Leetul Gogoi was awarded for using a civilian as a “human shield” in Budgam.

    The Indian army’s history tells us that Cariappa showed great valour as a commander and the success he obtained was squarely his own. But many people in India may not know that apart from his military valour, he employed another natural tool as a workable mechanism to deal with the people all around including the enemy. Reading authors like B.C. Khanduri, J.S. Bindra, S.K. Sinha, L.P. Sen, K.C. Cariappa and others, I came to know of many interesting stories woven around the personality of that great soldier. When I came to know of Cariappa’s Waziristan experience, I was flabbergasted.

    In June 1939, Cariappa was transferred to the 1st Battalion of the Rajput Regiment which became his parent unit. The battalion moved to Waziristan and he had to spend three years there. He was posted Waziristan in 1922 as well.

    In November 1945, Cariappa was finally given command of a brigade. He was posted as commander of the Bannu Frontier Brigade in Waziristan.

    Having served in the NWFP as a young officer, Cariappa was conversant with the terrain as well as the habits of the Pathan tribesmen who lived in the area. He had seen that the British policy of trying to keep them under control by force had not succeeded and he resolved to try a different method. He decided to win the hearts and minds of the tribesmen by extending a hand of friendship. He knew that they were warm and hospitable if treated with respect and as equals.

    One day, while passing through a village, he saw a group of Pathan women carrying pitchers of water. When he found out that they had to fetch water daily from another village, four miles away, he immediately ordered a well to be dug near their own village. He followed this gesture with many similar deeds. The Pathans were overwhelmed and started calling him “Khalifa”. Later, when the region was torn by communal strife, Bannu remained a haven of peace thanks to the goodwill generated by Cariappa. When Jawaharlal Nehru visited Bannu in 1945 as head of the Interim Government, Cariappa organised a public meeting which was attended by all tribal leaders. The next day, when he visited Razmak where another brigade was stationed, Nehru was fired upon by the tribesmen and the visit had to be called off. Nehru was impressed by Cariappa’s leadership qualities and rapport with the tribesmen.

    Veekay’s History Book (Victory of Knowledge Global Publications) tells us an interesting story about Cariappa. “In February 1946, he was appointed Presiding Officer of one of the General Court Martials constituted to try members of the Indian National Army (INA). Before the trial, he visited some of the detention camps, where the prisoners were lodged. He found them full of rancour and hatred against the British for treating them badly and holding them without trial. Cariappa was pained by their plight and wrote to the Adjutant General, requesting him to expedite the trials. He also recommended that some of them such as Shah Nawaz Khan, G.S. Dhillon and P.K. Sehgal should be pardoned. But, when as Chief of the Armed Forces he was to consider the recommendation to accommodate Indian National Army (INA) personnel including Shahnawaz, Dhillon and Sehgal and he refused to take them into the Indian Army, particularly for the reason that they would bring politics into the Army. There was a lot of pressure on him for this and Nehru relented only after Cariappa threatened to resign on this issue.”

    I invested some more time to understand both sides of Cariappa’s character. He was a very tough general when it came to leading the armed forces, as was required by military ethics, and he never compromised his principles.

    B.C. Khanduri, who worked with him as operations staff officer, says in his book Field Marshal K.M. Cariappa; His life and Times that, “Once between Mahura and Uri, he was snipped at from close quarters. He showed no signs of fear while his staff officers perspired.”

    Lt. Col. J.S. Bindra, as intelligence and liaison officer with Cariappa recalls in his book an incident at Srinagar. He says: “The 268 Infantry Brigade was without a commander for a few days. Cariappa informed Army Headquarters to post Brigadier Bikram Singh. He (Bikram Singh) represented to the army that his relations with Bakshi Ghulam Mohammad, the then Deputy PM of J&K, were not too friendly and that Bakshi might create problems for him in his command.Cariappa asked him what else? Then, he told Bikram to put his ego in his pocket and do what he desired him to do. Bikram was in Tithwal by the same night and on the job”.

    The other side of his character is described in Veekay’s History Book: “While Cariappa admonished Thimayya for lighting a cigarette while travelling in an Army vehicle, he asked the driver to stop to allow Thimayya to smoke.”

    Lt. General Sen in his book, Slender was the Thread: Kashmir Confrontation 1947-48, describes another quality which Cariappa possessed and it was his broad-mindedness. He says, “He treated all troops the same and was utterly free of any parochial feelings.” He was best known for his love for the Indian soldier. Troops not only loved him, they worshipped him. But then, he never pardoned if anybody indulged in a crime.

    Cariappa is no more but his philosophy of military leadership is available to us. Many retired and serving generals have emphasised again and again that there is no military solution to the Kashmir dispute. It has to be resolved through methods other than force. I am confident that the spirit of Cariappa’s soldiery would be a better guide at this critical juncture of the Union’s relationship with Kashmir.

    The writer is a senior Congress leader and former Union minister.

    source: http://www.indianexpress.com / The Indian Express / Home> Opinion> Columns / by Saifuddin Soz / October 05th, 2017

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    Up in arms:Activists protesting as part of the ‘Save Kodagu, Save Cauvery’ campaign at Kutta in Kodagu on Saturday.Special Arrangement

    Up in arms:Activists protesting as part of the ‘Save Kodagu, Save Cauvery’ campaign at Kutta in Kodagu on Saturday.Special Arrangement

    Activists from nearly 30 organisations hold Save Kodagu, Save Cauvery rally

    To draw public attention to the rapid ecological devastation of Kodagu brought about by development projects, scores of people staged a protest at Kutta as part of the ‘Save Kodagu, Save Cauvery’ campaign on Saturday.

    Activists and citizens from nearly 30 organisations and NGOs participated in it to stem the tide of what they described as the growing ecological destruction of Kodagu district, which is also the catchment area for the Cauvery.

    The activists assembled first at Ponnampet and were joined by others at Kutta, bordering Karnataka and Kerala where a rally was taken out. The highway was blocked for nearly an hour.

    The campaign had its share of critics who questioned the motives and rationale of the conclusions of the activists but the latter described them as misguided by vested interest groups.

    The crux of the issue revolves around new projects such as two railway lines that will link Kodagu or cut across the district, besides national highways.

    The rapid urbanisation of the region, besides indiscriminate tree felling under the guise of “development” has reduced the green cover of the district over the years, according to the activists.

    They have objected to the Mysuru-Kushalnagar railway line which is being bandied about as a market link for coffee growers of the district with the rest of India while the other railway line is the proposed link between Mysuru and Thalassery in Kerala which passes through some of the dense forests and elephant habitat. Col. C.P. Muthanna (retd) of Coorg Wildlife Society said such projects would only escalate human-animal conflict in Kodagu as these so-called development works would lead to habitat fragmentation, disturbance and destruction.

    The Save Kodagu, Save Cauvery campaign also highlighted the vanishing green cover in the district and linked to it depleting rainfall in the region since the last few years which has affected local agriculture.

    Being the catchment area for the Cauvery the forest cover had to be protected and if the river and its ecosystem was not saved, then nothing would survive, said the activists, pointing out that the river served as a source of drinking water to people in south Karnataka region, including Mysuru and Bengaluru.

    Reiterating that every hectare of land acquired for development projects in Kodagu would result in the felling of nearly 350 fully grown and mature trees, the activists said the extent of tree-felling and damage to the ecology could only be imagined as large swathes of land extending to hundreds of hectares were needed for such projects.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> National> Karnataka / by Special Correspondent / Mysuru – August 27th, 2017

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    MonappaScholarshipKF26aug2017

    ‘India and Cambridge university have had an enduring relationship’

    The Pemanda Monappa Scholarship was presented to Rupsa Banerjee, a student of English literature, by the Chief Justice of the Madras High Court Indira Banerjee at a function on Wednesday. Ms. Banerjee will study at the University of Cambridge, U.K.

    Speaking on the occasion, the Chief Justice said studying in an institution like Cambridge broadened the outlook of students.

    Congratulating the student, Chief Justice Banerjee hoped she would imbibe the qualities of Pemanda Monappa.

    She recalled that in 1948, the officer was hand-picked by Sardar Vallabhai Patel to be the Inspector of Police of Hyderabad State despite the fact that they had never met.

    P.M. Belliappa, former IAS officer and managing trustee of the Pemanda Monappa Trust, said the event was a celebration of the values that his late father followed till the very end.

    Helen Pennant, director, Cambridge Trust, said it has been in existence for 30 years. It supports 500 scholars annually, she said. “One in three students at the university comes from outside the U.K.,” she said.

    N. Ravi, Director, Kasturi and Sons Ltd., said the relationship between India and Cambridge had been an enduring one and several Indians, including mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujam, statistician P.C. Mahalanobis, Nobel Prize winner Venky Ramakrishnan and three former Prime Ministers were alumni of Cambridge.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> Cities> Chennai / by Special Correspondent / Chennai – August 03rd, 2017

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