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    Kannada and Culture Minister Umashree on Monday said that work on construction of General Thimayya Museum in Kodagu will be completed by March next year, before his birth anniversary.

    Replying to S Veena Achaiah (Cong), who sought to know the reason for the construction work being very slow, in the Legislative Council, she said the land where the museum is being built was owned by Transport department. There was some delay in transferring the land to the Kannada and Culture department. So the construction work was going in slow pace, she added.

    The minister said the department has now expedited the work, and it will be completed by March next year.

    Earlier, Veena Achaiah said the government had sanctioned Rs 5.50 crore for General Thimayya Museum in 2013. So far, only Rs 45 lakh has been utilised. Works should be expedited and state government should ensure that the museum works are completed by March. It should be inaugurated by March 21, birth anniversary of General Thimayya, she added.

    To another question by Jayamala of Congress on installing the statue of former chief minister K C Reddy at Vidhana Soudha, Umashree said the government is unable to do so because of the Supreme Court order.
    She, however, added that an appropriate decision will be taken after holding a meeting with Chief Minister Siddaramaiah in this regard.

    source: http://www.deccanherald.com / Deccan Herald / Home> State / DH News Service, Belagavi / November 20th, 2017

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    Robin Uthappa’s unselfish contribution in Rohit Sharma’s 264

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    November 13 is often remembered for India batsman Rohit Sharma’s magnanimous 264 against Sri Lanka in the 4th ODI of the series at the iconic Eden Gardens, Kolkata in 2014. Rohit’s freakish 264 is widely recognised as among the best ODI knocks by any batsman but very few can recall the huge role played by his partner Robin Uthappa in the death overs.

    Uthappa joined Rohit when India’s score were 276-4 after 40.2 overs. The Indian opener had already gone past 150-run mark and in next 58 balls, Rohit managed to accumulate more than 100 runs and created a world record which was far away from the second best at that time.

    Playing against a poor bowling Sri Lankan attack, Uthappa had the perfect chance to score fifty or more which could have helped him in cementing his place in the ODI side for the coming World Cup 2015. But it was Uthappa’s inglorious selfless run-a-ball 16 which was the reason behind Rohit posting a colossal score to his name.

    The duo added 128 runs in just 58 balls together, with Uthappa’s contribution of mere 12.5% to the partnership. The percentage number definitely looks very small but it was all for the sake of team and batting partner. Out of 16 runs Uthappa scored, 12 were singles, which ensured Rohit stayed on strike for as much as possible.

    Further, Uthappa played only 6 more international matches for India — 4 ODIs and 2 T20Is till July 2015. Uthappa has been one of the big player from Karnataka and from 2017-18 season onwards, he has shifted to Saurashtra in domestic crcket.

    source: http://www.sportswallah.com / SportsWallah.com / Home> Cricket> News / by SportsWallah Desk / November 13th, 2017

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    KM Cariappa received the prestigious order of the British Empire (OBE) for his role in the Burma against the Japanese during the Second World War.

    Army Chief General Bipin Rawat on Saturday pitched for Field Marshal Kodandera Madappa Cariappa, independent India’s first army chief, to be conferred the Bharat Ratna. However, few know of the man whose unrelenting patriotism and secular beliefs blazed a trail in the Indian Army.

    KM Cariappa is a man known for many firsts, but most importantly, he is known as the man who took charge of the Indian Army from its last British Commander in Chief, General Sir Roy Bucher. Born on January 28, 1899, in Coorg, Cariappa completed his education at Central High School at Madikeri and went on to study at the Presidency College in Madras.

    However, Cariappa began his Army stint under the British and was among the few selected for the first batch of KCIOs (King’s Commissioned Indian Officers) at the Daly Cadet College in Indore and was commissioned in the Carnatic Infantry. He was in active service with the 37 (Prince of Wales) Dogra in Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq) and then posted to the 2nd Rajput Light Infantry (Queen Victoria’s Own). Cariappa went on to become the first Indian officer to undergo the course at Staff College, Quetta in 1933. In 1946, he got promoted as the Brigadier of the Frontier Brigade Group.

    By Indian independence, Cariappa saw action in Iraq, Syria, Iran and Burma and became the first Indian Officer to be given command of a unit in 1942. He went on to receive many awards and accolades in his career spanning three decades. He received the prestigious order of the British Empire (OBE) for his role in the Burma against the Japanese during the Second World War.

    In 1947, Cariappa became the first Indian to be selected to undergo a training course at Imperial Defence College, Camberly, UK. His role during the Partition is rarely mentioned, during which he oversaw the division of the Army. Cariappa also led the Indian forces on the Western Front during the Indo-Pak War of 1947 and successfully recaptured Zojila, Drass and Kargil and established a linkup with Leh.

    On January 15, 1949, Cariappa became the first Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Army. He held the five-star rank of field marshal, the highest honour in the Indian Army, which Sam Manekshaw is the only other officer to have held. He was also awarded the ‘Order of the Chief Commander of the Legion of Merit’ by US President, Harry Truman
    Even after his retirement from the Army in 1953, Cariappa was not finished yet and served as the High Commissioner to Australia and New Zealand till 1956. He died in Bengaluru in 1993 at the age of 94.

    With PTI inputs

    source: http://www.indianexpress.com / The Indian Express / Home> Who Is / by Express Web Desk / New Delhi – November 04th, 2017

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    Gen Rawat’s comments came in response to a request by Col KC Subbayya from The Field Marshal Cariappa General Thimayya (FMCGT) forum about recommending the Bharat Ratna to Cariappa, who hails from Kodagu district in Karnataka.

    File photo of Army chief General Bipin Rawat. (PTI)

    File photo of Army chief General Bipin Rawat. (PTI)

    Gonikoppal:

    Army Chief General Bipin Rawat on Saturday pitched for conferring the country’s highest civilian honour Bharat Ratna on independent India’s first army chief, Field Marshal General K M Cariappa.

    “The time has also come to recommend Field Marshal Cariappa for the award of Bharat Ratna. If others can get it, I see no reason why he should not, a deserving personality for the same. We will shortly address the issue on priority,” he said

    Gen Rawat’s comments came in response to a request by Col KC Subbayya from The Field Marshal Cariappa General Thimayya (FMCGT) forum about recommending the Bharat Ratna to Cariappa, who hails from Kodagu district in Karnataka.

    Rawat unveiled the statues of Cariappa and General K S Thimayya, also a former Army chief who hailed from Kodagu district in Karnataka, at a function at the Cauvery College at Gonikoppal, Kodagu district.

    Former Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Military, Field Marshal Kodandera Madappa Cariappa (1899 - 1993), 1975. (Photo by Dinodia Photos/Getty Images)

    Former Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Military, Field Marshal Kodandera Madappa Cariappa (1899 – 1993), 1975. (Photo by Dinodia Photos/Getty Images)

    Terming Kodagu (formerly Coorg) as a ‘land of warriors’, Rawat said he is proud, privileged and humbled for having got the opportunity to unveil the memorial in memory of Field Marshal Cariappa and General K S Thimayya.

    Kodagu continues to serve the nation with a large number of officers and men serving the Army, he said and voiced hope that “there will be more Chiefs in the future who will rise from this great land”.

    Cariappa was the first Indian Commander-in-Chief of the Indian Army and was conferred the rank of Field Marshal on April 28, 1986.

    He was also a recipient of the prestigious order of the British Empire (OBE) for his role in the Burma campaign against the Japanese during the Second World War.

    Cariappa also led the Indian forces on the Western Front during the Indo-Pak War of 1947.

    He held the five-star rank of field marshal, the highest honour in the Indian Army, which Field Marshal Sam Manekshaw is the only other officer to have held.

    Cariappa, whose military career spanned over three decades, retired from the Army in 1953 and later served as the High Commissioner to Australia and New Zealand till 1956.

    He died in Bengaluru in 1993 at the age of 94.

    source: http://www.news18.com / News18.com / Home> India / PTI / November 04th, 2017

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    Chief of the Army Staff General Bipin Rawat will unveil statues of Field Marshal K.M. Cariappa and General K.S. Thimayya at a function in Cauvery College, Gonikoppal, Kodagu district, on Saturday.

    The history of valour in the Indian Army is incomplete without mention of Kodavas, and amongst them Field Marshal Cariappa, and General Thimayya stand out as shining examples of leadership and inspiration, a press release said. Field Marshal Cariappa was the first Indian Commander in Chief of the Indian Army and was conferred the rank of Field Marshal on April 28, 1986. He was also a recipient of the Order of the British Empire for his role in the Burma campaign against the Japanese during World War 2. General Thimayya was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 1954 and took over as Army Chief on May 7, 1957.

    The site for the statues — located close to the ‘lyn house’, the ancestral house of the Kodavdira family belonging to the Generals — has been provided by the Cauvery Educational Society. The bronze statues (7’6” in height) were crafted in Bidadi by Shilpi Vijay for a cost of ₹17 lakh. This is the only location in India where statues of Army Chiefs stand next to one another.

    The Field Marshal Cariappa General Thimayya Forum has been formed with the aim of helping veterans and motivating youngsters to join the armed forces. The forum started celebrating the birth anniversaries of the Generals in 2007, and today, Field Marshal Cariappa’s birth anniversary has become a government event.

    Efforts are on to do the same for Gen Thimayya’s birth anniversary as well. The forum is also actively involved in turning ‘Sunny Side’, which was Gen. Thimayya’s residence, into a museum and war memorial. According to the release, the plan is to complete the work by mid-2018.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Karnataka / by Special Correspondent / Mysuru – November 01st, 2017

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    Chief of the Army staff General Bipin Rawat will honour the Kodava martial warriors and unveil statues of First Field Marshal of Indian Army K M Cariappa and Padma Bhushan General K S Thimayya on November 4 at Gonikoppal in Kodagu district on November 4.

    Field Marshal Cariappa is also a recipient of the prestigious order of the British Empire (OBE) for his role in the Burma campaign against the Japanese during the 2nd World War. General Thimayya, was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 1954 and took over as Chief of the Indian Army on 7 May, 1957.

    The site for the statues has been provided by the Cauvery Educational Society and is located in close vicinity to the ‘lyn house’, the ancestral house of Kodavdira family belonging to theGenerals. The two statues are placed side by side about 25′ above the road level.

    The bronze statues, 7’6″ in height have been made in Bidadi by Shilpi Vijay at a total cost of Rs 17 lakhs. This is the only LoC in India where statues of the Army Chiefs are Co-located.

    The Field Marshal Cariappa General Thimayya forum was formed with the aim of helpingthe veterans of the area and to motivate youngsters to join the Defence Forces.

    The two bronze statues will be unveiled in presence of Lt General R K Anand, General Officer Commanding, Dakshin Bharat Area, Major General K S Nijjar, General Officer Commanding, Karnataka & Kerala Sub Area.UNI MSP AE1323

    — (UNI) — C-1-1-DL0100-1112494.Xml
    source: http://www.news.webindia123.com / WebIndia123 / Home> News> India / Bengaluru – Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

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    (Picture Courtesy: ATP World Tour Twitter handle)

    (Picture Courtesy: ATP World Tour Twitter handle)

    New Delhi :

    In a memorable day for Indian tennis, Rohan Bopanna won the Erste Bank Open title in Vienna with Pablo Cuevas while the team of Saketh Myneni and Vijay Sundar Prashanth clinched the Vietnam Open trophy at the Ho Chi Minh City.

    However, Divij Sharan and his partner Scott Clayton ended runners-up at the Brest Challenger event in France, preventing what could have been an incredible as well as unique culmination to the week for the Indian players on the circuit.

    In Vienna, unseeded Bopanna and Cuevas saved two match points before prevailing 7-6(7), 6-7(4), 11-9 over Sam Querrey and Marcelo Demoliner.

    Bopanna and Cuevas were down 7-9 in the deciding super tie-breaker but saved both the match points to win the title.

    It was third title of the season for Bopanna, having won Chennai Open (with Jeevan Nedunchezhiyan) and Monte Carlo Masters (with Cuevas).

    In Vietnam, the unseeded Indian pair of Myneni and Vijay Prashanth quelled the challenge of the Japanese combination of Go Soeda and Ben Mclachlan 7-6(3), 7-6(5) in the summit clash of the $50,000 event.

    It was first title of the season for Myneni and maiden Challenger level trophy for Prashanth.

    “It was a great week. We combined well and enjoyed ourselves. I still feel I have something left in singles but definitely I will focus on doubles too,” Prashanth said.

    Myneni, who has missed most part of the season due to injuries and has slipped to 724 in singles, was also asked if he would shift focus on doubles but he responded with a cryptic reply.

    “Still the same plan as before, nothing has changed with me,” he said, indicating that he still have singles in mind.

    Divij Sharan and his British partner Scott Clayton ended runners-up at the Brest Challenger following a 4-6, 5-7 defeat against Sander Arends and Antonio Sancic.

    After losing the opening set, Sharan and Clayton led the second set 5-3 but lost four games in a row to lose the title clash.

    It was second consecutive final for Sharan, having won the European Open (ATP 250 event) with Scott Lipsky last week in Antwerp, Belgium.

    source: http://www.timesofindia.indiatimes.com / The Times of India / News> Sports News> Tennis News / PTI / October 29th, 2017

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    After losing out to the British, the Haleri royal family moved to Periyapatna and later to Mysuru city where they settled at Shivrampete.

    Madikeri Palace is in a shambles now

    Madikeri Palace is in a shambles now

    Centuries ago, the battlefields of Coorg thundered with their war cry as they took on marauding armies of the invader, sowing the seeds for a martial race which continues to amaze the world with its heroism and audacity. But the days of the dynasty and the royals are long gone and the kings of Coorg, like everyone else, now have to contend with the rigours of a modern age where democracy, the great leveller, makes sure everyone has to toil for his bread. Some dynasties have switched to politics with remarkable success , others preferred a life as ordinary as it could be, sacrificing their vast tracts of lands, palaces, forts and the antiques of their forefathers. M.B. Girish profiles the Coorg royal dynasty which once ruled from Madikeri and now runs a flour-mill and a chilli powder shop in the busy Shivarampete of Mysuru city

    It has been a remarkable journey for the family members of HCN Wodeyar, the king of Madikeri, one finds it hard to believe that here sitting before you, are the descendants of a royal family. Except for a huge pile of documents gathered from the authorities concerned, HCN Wodeyar no longer has the antiques left behind by his forefathers nor does he lead a lavish lifestyle which could remind people that his family once held sway over Madikeri.

    MadikeriRoyal02KF30oct2017

    For more than a century, the family has been running a flour mill attached to a store selling masala powder and flour on the busy Vinoba road in Shivrampete. Sachida nanada Hittina Angadi (flour shop) as it is known, has history written all over it-on the walls of the store, one can spot a couple of portraits of royal family members. An inquisitive visitor who ventures to ask whose portraits they are, would get an answer that the store is run by descendants of the Haleri Ursu Royal Family who once ruled Kodagu.

    Not many know that the store now belongs to Haleri Chinnanna Nagaraju Wodeyar (75), the King of the Princely State of Kodagu and was started by his father Chinnanna. The lineage of the Haleri royal family starts with Veera Raja who ruled from 1600 AD and was succeeded by Appaji Raja and later Muddu Raja who ruled the region from 1633 AD to1687 AD. The rulers belonged to the Banajiga Lingayat community.

    HCN Wodeyar and (right) his flour mill in Mysuru

    HCN Wodeyar and (right) his flour mill in Mysuru

    HCN Wodeyar tracing the history of the royal family, says his great grandfather Haleri Mallappa was married to queen Devammaji and he is the son of Chinnanna and the heir of the erstwhile royal family of Madikeri. Devammaji ruled the place for two years from 1809-11 before Britishers took control of the region.

    To support his claim that he is the true heir, HCN has maintained various records issued by different authorities on the family tree of his erstwhile royal family. When asked about the decline of his family, HCN turns emotional and says, “everything is gone.”

    After the Britishers started making inroads into the Princely States in India one after the other, his royal family too became a victim of British rule and gave away the kingdom which once stretched from Kushalanagar to Mangaluru. “Our great grandfathers, mainly Dodda Veera Raja traded in lemon, tobacco, oranges among others which were sent to markets in Kerala and Delhi in those days,” he recalls.

    After losing out to the British, the Haleri royal family moved to Doddabeedi in Periyapatna and later shifted to Mysuru city where they settled at Shivrampete.

    The royals-turned business family now stays at Chamaraja Mohalla where a board in Kannada at the entrance facing the road, states, “HCN Wodeyar is the owner of Madikeri Palace.”

    The Palace of the Haleri royal family was built during the rule of Muddu Raja and later modified during British rule. Though his kingdom has disappeared, HCN longs to regain ownership of Madikeri Palace, situated on 77 acres at Karnangeri and is engaged in a legal battle since 1998. “The palace is in a dilapidated condition and if the structure is given to me, repairs will be taken up to restore its past glory,” he says.

    HCN first got to see his ancestral palace when he was a child. “My father took me to the palace for the first time and since then, I have visited the palace about 15 times,” he says.

    At Chamaraja Mohalla, he lives in a small tiled house with his wife, sons and grandchildren. His grandchildren play on the wooden sofas while wife Sowbhagya attends to domestic chores with her daughters-in-law.

    The family no longer has the royal antiques such as swords, spearhead, royal seals and royal attire. “A throne was taken away by the British among other precious items,” laments the Haleri king. Just then, HCN’s grandson Milind (13) brings out a lone sword from the room and flaunts it.

    Though he no longer lives in Madikeri in the palace, HCN says people still hold the royal family in high esteem. Milind, a class 8 student at JSS Public School says, “My classmates and teachers are aware that I hail from a royal family.” As many as 70 types of masala powders are sold at the shop- both vegetarian and non-vegetarian. There are people like Prakash, a resident of Hassan, who says he is surprised to know that the flour shop is run by the Coorg royal family and recalls that he has walked by the shop on a number of occasions but had no idea about the history of the family running it.

    Not many have been able to make the transition from royalty to a democratic way of living smoothly, many have struggled and fallen into bad times. It has not been easy for the Coorg royal family either for the times have changed but then they have risen to the challenge in the hope of a better morrow. Nor would the Coorgis like to forget the Haleri royal family for they bring back memories of the times of the kings, of grandeur and magnificence which no ordinary mortal can match.

    source: http://www.deccanchronicle.com / Deccan Chronicle / Home> Naton – In Other News / by MB Girish / October 29th, 2017

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    Faded colour, blackened walls, pathetic condition of the roof and plastic sheets to protect from rain…This is the story of historical Madikeri Fort. The fort throws light on the glorious grandeur of a bygone era. However, it is in a neglected state.

    The magnificent fort is in ruins due to the negligence of the authorities of the Department of Archaeology. Due lack of maintenance, a portion of the fort has collapsed.

    Owing to lack of government buildings in Kodagu district, the fort has been converted for the administrative purposes. It is referred to as ‘Hale Vidhana Soudha.’ The fort houses Zilla Panchayat office, land documents assistant director’s office, department for the Empowerment of Differently Abled and Senior Citizens, offices of MLAs K G Bopaiah, M P Appachu Ranjan, MLCs Sunil Subramani and Veena Achiah, district library, court complex and Agriculture department.

    “Hundreds of vehicles enter the premises of the Fort. The Fort is losing its identity. Though a signboard on the protected monument is placed, attempts are being made to disfigure the monument,” said local residents.

    There is no protection for ‘Firangi’ and accessory of rulers. The tourists will be disappointed after viewing the Fort.

    It was said that Haleri ruler Mudduraja had constructed mud fort and palace in the 17th century. Later, it was rebuilt by Tipu Sultan and named it as Jaffarabad. In 1790, Dodda Veerarajendra confiscated the Fort. The Fort came under British rule in 1834.

    The magnificent Fort is visible from any corner of Madikeri town. The fort is in the shape of the circle and two rock-cut elephants attract the visitors. The museum of the Department of Archaeology and Museums is situated in a church built in 1855. The palace that was built by Immadi Lingaraja Odeyar houses government offices and the palace is in a shambles.

    Tourist guide Prakash said, “Tourists are not keen on entering the palace. The rare photographs have lost its charm and beauty. The authorities have not taken any measure to conserve palace that may cease to be a heritage site shortly.”

    DH News Service
    source: http://www.deccanherald.com / Deccan Herald / Home> District / by Adithya KA / DH News Service / Madikeri – October 21st, 2017

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    October 24th, 2017adminCoffee News, Records, All, World Opinion
    An Ethiopian woman roasts a pan of green coffee beans in their traditional technique

    An Ethiopian woman roasts a pan of green coffee beans in their traditional technique

    Stepping into a small unassuming villa on the backstreet of Al Fahidi district in Bur Dubai, I feel I am embracing the cultural ethos of several centuries. The aroma of freshly brewing coffee wafts in the air. I walk past a gift shop to reach the centre of a unique wind-tunnel house named the Dubai Coffee Museum, which was set up in October 2014. My journey into the history of coffee begins as soon as I enter the creator and owner of the museum, Khalid Al Mulla.

    I accompany him on a round of the ground floor where each space provides a glimpse of different coffee-drinking cultures. As we step in his favourite zone, he says, “Here is the coffee from Ethiopia where coffee drinking reputedly began at first.” Here, a stylish Ethiopian lady is roasting a pan of green coffee beans in a traditional technique. Next to her is Egyptian barista Abdul, dressed in an Egyptian ‘galabeya’ and skull cap, standing guard on a customised silver and gold coffee machine.

    An ancient coffee grinder

    An ancient coffee grinder

    The small exhibition rooms, where coffee beans from countries across the world are neatly stacked, are also home to coffee artefacts and antiques. Khalid’s collection is huge. Prominent among the pieces are distinctive 300-year-old jug-shaped clay coffee pots known as ‘jebena’ (the Yemeni equivalent is ‘jamena’), which were historically used by the Ethiopians .

    Steps inside the museum lead up to a literature room displaying texts from 18th century to the present day. One such text, Johann Friedrich von Pfeiffer’s 1784 encyclopaedia, is believed to be the oldest printed text on coffee, with 177 pages dedicated to ‘kaffee’ as Johann would have called it. There is also a custom-built brew bar, where one can sip acup of caffeine powered rocket fuel brewed in the traditional Japanese siphon method.

    The tour ends with a cup of Ethiopian coffee at a cosy Emirati-style ‘majlis’ on the ground floor, drunk in the local Bedouin coffee tradition. Khalid says, “As the director of Dubai-based coffee importers and roasters, Easternmen and Co., I participated in trade shows. I was surprised to see visitors’ interest in these objects, which forced me to create the first-of-its-kind coffee museum in Dubai. The concept is to showcase global coffee history.”

    source: http://www.newindianexpress.com / The New Indian Express / Home> Magazine / by Sharmila Chand / Dubai, UAE – October 21st, 2017

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