Kodagu First

a Celebration. Positive News, Facts & Achievements about Kodagu, Coorgs and the People of Kodagu – here at Home and Overseas
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    July 12th, 2017adminArts, Culture & Entertainment

    Deputy Commissioner Richard Vincent D’Souza directed officials to file an FIR against parents who push their minor children to marriage.

    The instances of child marriages have come to light in the district, said the deputy commissioner. Chairing a district-level coordination committee meeting here on Tuesday, he reminded, “Child marriage is an offence,” and warned of initiating action against officials from the Women and Child Development Department if any child marriage case is reported in the district.

    “Taluk-level workshops should be organised to create awareness on the ill-effects of child marriage, dowry system and domestic violence. Child marriages take place for lack of fear of law. The people, therefore, should have knowledge and fear of the law,” explained the deputy commissioner.

    D’Souza directed the officials to supply nutritious food to the children in anganwadi centres. A list of nutritious food being supplied to pregnant women, puerperal women, and adolescent girls should be prepared, he added.

    Zilla Panchayat chief executive officer (CEO) Charulatha Somal said that the work on anganwadi buildings should be completed at the earliest.

    Women and Child Development Department deputy director Mumthaz also spoke during the meeting.

    source: http://www.deccanherald.com / Deccan Herald / Home> District / DH News Service, Madikeri / July 12th, 2017

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    July 11th, 2017adminCoffee News, World Opinion

    Nilphamari farmer defies odds to produce the beans

    Beans harvested from the coffee plants of Abdul Kuddus in Munsipara village of Nilphamari's Kishoreganj upazila. Photo: Star

    Beans harvested from the coffee plants of Abdul Kuddus in Munsipara village of Nilphamari’s Kishoreganj upazila. Photo: Star

    by EAM Asaduzzaman and Andrew Eagle

    Bangladesh has a long, established history as a producer of quality tea. As for that other hot beverage, coffee, despite rising popularity among Bangladeshi consumers over the past few decades, there is no such agricultural tradition. Nursery owner Abdul Kuddus, from Munsipara village in Nilphamari’s Kishoreganj upazila, however, has taken the first steps to change that. He decided to grow coffee, driven by nothing more than unstoppable curiosity.

    “I first heard about coffee in 2009 at a conference run by the Nursery Owners Association,” says Abdul, an energetic septuagenarian who yet walks with a spring in his step. “For a long time I wanted to grow it but I couldn’t procure any saplings.”

    “For about the whole of his life Abdul has been inquisitive on the subject of rare plants,” explains his neighbour Fazal Kadir, a primary school headmaster.

    “Finally in 2014, I managed to purchase 254 coffee saplings from Cox’s Bazar,” Abdul continues.

    Abdul Kuddus

    Abdul Kuddus

    “I contacted the agriculture extension department for advice on how to grow it, but they were uninterested.” Thus Abdul relied on common sense, planting the saplings on his fifteen decimals with a reasonable distance between each one.

    The plants seemed to appreciate Abdul’s efforts. With organic fertiliser they grew quickly. He decided to prune them, cutting their tops such that they didn’t grow any higher than five feet. In 2016 Abdul held his breath. The two-year-old crop for the first time began to grow fruit, which blackened as they ripened.

    Abdul’s family was unimpressed. Who’d ever heard of coffee being grown in Nilphamari?

    “We forbade father to proceed,” recalls his son Md Akram. “We told him all his efforts would be in vain but he didn’t listen. He collected the mature fruit and used a wooden tool, a “dheki” to break them open and bring out the beans.”

    “Of course there is no specialised machine to crush coffee here,” says Abdul. “So I took the beans to a flour mill and ask them to grind it. I got 67 kilograms of coffee powder.”

    Despite the innovative refining process involved, Abdul’s groundbreaking coffee is proving popular.

    “The coffee produced in Kishoreganj upazila tastes really good and has a nice aroma,” says Siddiqur Rahman, who used to be the upazila nirbahi officer of Kishorganj and now works as an additional deputy commissioner in Narail district.

    “I tasted Abdul’s coffee and found it better than the imported brands available in the market,” says Sayed Hossain Shabul, president of a local citizens’ committee.

    Based on the favourable reviews of consumers, Abdul went to the Bangladesh Standards and Testing Institution in Rajshahi some months ago to apply for a licence for his coffee.

    “They said it was not on their list, so I failed,” he says. “However I did get recognition from the district civil surgeon’s office which issued a licence under the Food Safety Act 2013 under the name “The Bismillah Coffee”.

    Eight ounces of coffee contains 135 milligrams of caffeine, explains Prof Abdul Latif, head of the botany department at Nilphamari Government College.

    “It’s a popular drink that serves as an energy source. The plant is bushy, of medium height and evergreen. It yields bunches of small, marble-like green fruit which is then crushed to extract the coffee powder.”

    Abdul earned Tk 1.3 lakh from this year’s coffee crop, selling it for Tk 2,000 per kilogram in Dhaka.

    Now he wants to extend his plantation to cover thirty decimals. “If the government and private entrepreneurs get on board,” Abdul says, “then coffee cultivation can be a profitable segment of our agricultural future.”

    In the meantime, the local community is already convinced. Several locals have decided to follow Abdul’s lead, buying coffee saplings from his nursery at Tk 250 per piece.

    source: http://www.thedailystar.net / The Daily Star / Home> Back Page / by EAM Asaduzzaman & Andrew Eagle / July 09th, 2017

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    July 11th, 2017adminCoffee News, World Opinion

    Among people of various ethnicities and cultures, higher coffee consumption — whether caffeinated or decaffeinated — was associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality benefits, according to two new studies published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

    “Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and in the U.S. population,” Song-Yi Park, PhD, from the University of Hawai’i Cancer Center, and colleagues wrote. “Therefore, even a small health-promoting effect of coffee could have a substantial impact on public health.”

    Researchers for both studies noted that although recent studies have found that higher coffee consumption was associated with lower risk for all-cause death, the relationship between consumption and mortality in nonwhites and diverse European populations is unknown.

    The first study, focusing on nonwhite populations in the United States, included 185,855 blacks (17%), Native Hawaiians (7%), Japanese Americans (29%), Latinos (22%) and whites (25%) who were aged between 45 and 75 years at the time of recruitment from 1993 to 1996. Park and colleagues evaluated coffee consumption via a validated food-frequency questionnaire, which was updated approximately every 5 years. A total of 16% of participants reported not drinking coffee, 31% drank one cup a day, 25% drank two to three cups a day, 7% drank four or more cups a day and 21% had irregular coffee drinking habits. Participants were followed until 2012.

    During an average follow-up of 16.2 years, 58,397 deaths occurred. After adjusting for smoking and other potential confounders, the researchers identified an association between coffee intake and lower total mortality among those who drank one cup per day (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.85-0.91); two to three cups per day (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.79-0.86); or four or more cups per day (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.78-0.87]). Participants who drank one cup of coffee per day and two to three cups of coffee per day had a 12% and 18%, reduced risk of death, respectively. Both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee produced similar trends, according to the researchers.

    The inverse association between coffee consumption and mortality was significant for all ethnic groups studied except Native Hawaiians. Furthermore, never-smokers, participants younger than 55 years and those without chronic disease also demonstrated an inverse relationship. Intake of coffee consumption lowered the risk for death due to heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes and kidney disease.

    “Our findings support the recent dietary guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which indicate that moderate coffee consumption can be integrated into a healthy diet and lifestyle, by confirming an inverse association with mortality and suggesting that association’s generalizability to different racial/ethnic groups,” Park and colleagues concluded.

    These results can be applied to other ethnic groups without safety concerns because the association was observed in four different ethnicities, Veronica W. Setiawan, PhD, lead author from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, said in a press release.

    “This study is the largest of its kind and includes minorities who have very different lifestyles,” Setiawan said. “Seeing a similar pattern across different populations gives stronger biological backing to the argument that coffee is good for you whether you are white, African-American, Latino or Asian.”

    “Coffee contains a lot of antioxidants and phenolic compounds that play an important role in cancer prevention,” she continued. “Although this study does not show causation or point to what chemicals in coffee may have this ‘elixir effect,’ it is clear that coffee can be incorporated into a healthy diet and lifestyle.”

    “We cannot say drinking coffee will prolong your life, but we see an association,” she added. “If you like to drink coffee, drink up! If you’re not a coffee drinker, then you need to consider if you should start.”

    The second study, led by Marc J. Gunter, PhD, from the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, focused on coffee intake and mortality risk in European populations, and included 521,330 participants mainly aged 35 years or older from Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Gunter and colleagues recruited these participants between 1992 and 2000.

    According to the data, 41,693 participants died during a mean follow-up of 16.4 years. The researchers observed a statistically significant lower all-cause mortality for participants in the highest quartile of coffee intake compared with those who did not drink coffee, among men (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.82-0.95) and women (HR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87-0.98). In addition, death due to digestive disease was lower in relation to coffee consumption for both men (HR = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.32-0.54) and women (HR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.46-0.78). The researchers found a statistically significant inverse relationship between coffee intake and with circulatory disease mortality (HR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.68-0.9) and cerebrovascular disease mortality (HR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.55-0.9) among women, as well as a positive association with ovarian cancer mortality (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07-1.61).

    Gunter and colleagues also evaluated whether coffee consumption was associated with serum biomarkers of liver function, inflammation and metabolic health in a subcohort of 14,800 participants. They found that higher intake of coffee was linked to lower serum alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, as well as C-reactive protein, lipoprotein(a) and glycated hemoglobin levels in women.

    “We found that higher coffee consumption was associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, and specifically for circulatory diseases, and digestive diseases,” Gunter said in a press release. “Importantly, these results were similar across all of the 10 European countries, with variable coffee drinking habits and customs. Our study also offers important insights into the possible mechanisms for the beneficial health effects of coffee.”

    “Due to the limitations of observational research, we are not at the stage of recommending people to drink more or less coffee,” he added. “That said, our results suggest that moderate coffee drinking — up to around three cups per day — is not detrimental to your health, and that incorporating coffee into your diet could have health benefits.”

    The researchers emphasized that more studies are necessary to determine which compound in coffee may be responsible for benefiting health and to explore the effect of coffee consumption on health outcomes.

    “These findings add to a growing body of evidence which indicates that drinking coffee not only is safe, but it may actually have a protective health effect for people,” Elio Riboli, MD, ScM, coauthor of the study from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London, said in the release. “While further research is needed, we can be confident that the results from a large European study confirm previous findings seen around the world.”

    In an accompanying editorial, Eliseo Guallar, MD, DrPH, from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and colleagues note that the relationship between coffee consumption and mortality “was modest and sensitive to confounding.”

    “Recommending coffee intake to reduce mortality or prevent chronic disease would be premature,” they wrote. “However, it is increasingly evident that moderate coffee intake up to three to five cups per day or caffeine intake up to 400 mg/d is not associated with adverse health effects in adults and can be incorporated into a healthy diet.” – by Alaina Tedesco

    References:

    Guallar E, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2017;doi:10.7326/M17-1503.

    Gunter MJ, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2017;doi:10.7326/M16-2945.

    Park SY, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2017;doi:10.7326/M16-2472.

    Disclosure: Park and colleagues report funding from the National Cancer Institute. Gunter and colleagues report funding from the European Commission Directorate-General for Health and Consumers and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Guallar and colleague report no relevant financial disclosures.

    source: http://www.healio.com / Healio / Home> Internal Medicine> Nutritional Fitness> In the Journals / July 10th, 2017

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    In 2017-18, three human and 11 elephant deaths have been reported till July 10. DH file photo.

    In 2017-18, three human and 11 elephant deaths have been reported till July 10. DH file photo.

    The Forest Department is planning to set up a Coorg Foundation to address the increasing incidents of man-elephant conflict in Kodagu district which has a large pachyderm population.

    This is the first time that the department is creating a foundation for a territorial area. It has already set up similar bodies in the tiger reserves of Kali, Bandipur and Nagarahole with a focus on man-tiger conflict to mobilise funds and to attend to the affected families.

    The Coorg Foundation will focus on man-animal conflict in general and man-elephant conflict in particular. It will address the needs of the families affected by such conflicts.

    “Our job does not end with giving a compensation of Rs 5 lakh to the family of a person who dies in conflict with elephants. We want to ensure that the education of the victim’s children is not affected and we will employ his wife, if needed. We will also provide for the affected family through the foundation,” P Anur Reddy, Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife), told DH.

    He continued: “We have chosen this district because many incidents of man-elephant conflict have happened in Kodagu. Setting up a foundation is in addition to the work already initiated by the department to reduce these conflicts. The foundation will do some hand-holding exercise for people and the affected families.”

    In 2015-16, nine elephants and 13 people died in such conflicts in three divisions in Kodagu district (Madikeri, Madikeri territorial and Virajpet), Forest Department records show. In 2016-17, eight elephants and nine people were killed. In 2017-18, three human and 11 elephant deaths have been reported till July 10.

    The proposal on the foundation has been sent to the state government for final approval. Work will start once the government approval comes, Reddy said.

    The Forest Department, the wildlife division, village forest committees and eco-tourism units will contribute for the foundation, besides raising funds locally.

    The foundation will be headed by the chief conservator of forests, Kodagu. The deputy conservators of forests of all three divisions, the heads of village forest committees and local administrators will also be a part of it.

    source: http://www.deccanherald.com / Deccan Herald / Home> State / by Bosky Khanna / DH News Service / Bengaluru – July 11th, 2017

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    Dubai :

    Kodagu Dakshina Kannada Gowda Samaja successfully concluded their annual ‘Blood Donation Campaign’ on Friday June 30 from 10 am to 3 pm at Sheikha Latifa Hospital, Dubai participated by very many members of the Sangha and friends.

    As the requirement of blood is very much essential during Ramadan, the active members of the Sangha from Ajman, Sharjah, Dubai& Abu Dhabi voluntarily came forward in large numbers and donated blood for a good cause.

    KodaguGowdaKF11jul2017

    Founder President Ashok Uluvarna, Past President Ganesh Achhandira, Harish Kodi, Vice President Sunil Mottemane, General Secretary Kanneriyan Sunil Kumar, and TreasurerDilipUluvaru, were present during the campaign supporting the donors. Also present were Navin Gowda of Vokkalikgara Sangha, Dr. Nanda Kishore & Dr. Rashmi Nandakishore of Riva Laser Beauty and Spa & Dr. TrilokChandrashekar of Medi Clinic Hospital, Abu Dhabi who all participated in the blood donation campaign.

    Rahul Bidappa, Ashish Kodi, AyushKodi, Meena Harish Kodi&JagadishKushalappa ably volunteered the campaign helping the donors in registering and completing the formalities. All those participated in the campaign were served with light refreshments, tea, coffee, fruits & juices by KusumadaraKodi, Ashok Ullvarana, ChandrakantKudwaje, Suresh Kumpala, SubramanyaKadikadka, Yathish Gowda, DilipUluvaru, SamarthaBantwal& Vinod Ramachandra who also sponsored the event.

    Roshan Kampala& Praveen Kalagadge were responsible for the campaign while BalaSalian took charge of the programme.

    source: http://www.daijiworld.com / DaijiWorld.com / Home> Middle East / by Shodhan Prasad / Wednesday – July 05th, 2017

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    CariappaMusicWingKF11jul2017

    by Nandu Andhare,

    The Cariappa Music Wing at Army Education Corp (AEC) Pachmarhi provides sheer delight, especially to one who loves and savours music, be it Western or Indian. Instrumental music emanating from the shining Brass saxophones, trumpets, clarinets, followed by the heart-beating drumming by the trainee drummers is something revering.

    The scribes visiting the Cariappa Music Wing took a melody out of the hills in their hearts. The visit was arranged by Defence PRO Wg Cdr Samir Gangakhedkar.

    Amid scenic beauty of Pachmarhi hills, the musicians were busy preparing for the farewell programme of the Station Commander.

    The sight was totally mesmerising. Seated in a semicircle under a 240-year-old huge Banyan tree, about 35 musicians, comprising of buglers, trumpeters, saxophonists, vocalists, drummers, repianists, flutiests and guitarists were waiting in anticipation. After the guests took their seats, the veil of suspense was lifted and out flew lilting tunes in perfect synchrony and harmony, enveloping the entire densely-wooded region with heavenly music.

    It was Field Marshal KM Cariappa’s idea to introduce music in military to instill patriotic feeling among personnel and help in bringing in uniformity, imbibing one-nation feeling. It was also his idea to shift the erstwhile location of the Military Music Wing at Belgaum to Pachmarhi.

    The Music wing offers three-year course in Martial Music to potential bandmasters. The school has experienced faculty from civil and military to train the new entrants in various instruments and even vocal. Hindustani classical music is also taught to the soldiers, who learn to play tabla, dholak, harmonium, jaltarang and various ragas based on which are some of the very popular Martial tunes and regimental songs, which when played with harmony can bring goose-bumps. Chests of soldiers and officers swell with pride when the band plays the signature song of the regiment. They may not have professional voices, but the voice of the vocalist exhibits raw patriotism, zeal and the strong will power to complete the task on hand fearlessly.

    The Music wing has a Shantiniketan Band Stand, enveloped under a 240-year-old Banyan tree, where the band practises in complete harmony with nature. Besides there are the Beethoven, Mozart, Tansen and Swami Haridas Training sheds. The Cariappa Music Wing of the AEC is on the lines of theworld famous Kimberly Hall of the UK, where trainees ranging from a Sepoy to Subhedar can pursue a course. Musicians from all the three wings of defence services are trained at the Cariappa Music Wing.

    It has a huge, impressive and up-to-date music library along with a section that displays an assortment of musical instruments, percussion items, with photographs of ceremonial presentations. The library has a good collection of Desh Ke Gaane, Tunes of Valsar, History of Music, Biography, Music Dictionary, Martial Music of Indian Army, Martial Bands and Music of the Indian Army. The Music school teaches Jazz, Pipe and Brass Band. Military music taught at the school is at par with international standards.

    For the visiting scribes, the musicians played the famous ‘Donau Wallen Waves of Danube Waltz’ which was simply haunting. This was followed by ‘Silver Sobre’, ‘Mack and Mack’, ‘Raga Bhupali’ on Jaltarang, and Vibraphon and Xylophone ‘In a Persian Market’. Devotional songs like ‘Deh Shiva’, an entity of Guru Gobind Singh, was also played much to the delight of the visitors.

    Another impressive part of the visit was the Protools Software or recording available at the state-of-the-art recording studio of the music school, where vocal recordings are made separately and then mixed with the rhythm of instrumentalists.

    The AEC Military Music Wing has also got its name in the prestigious Guinness Book of World Records for having performed at Vijay Chowk Delhi in which 4,459 musicians played under One Band Master during the Asiad games.

    As one left the arena of the lilting music, one could see, bandmasters practicing with their mace, wand, drummers letting loose a volley of beats while practicing ‘Beating of the Retreat’.

    Bagpipers were practicing patriotic songs, trumpeters letting off the haunting bugle call of the Last Post. At various points, the sound echoed down the Satpura hills of Pachmarhi.

    source: http://www.thehitavada.com / The Hitavada / Home / by Nandu Andhare / July 06th, 2017

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    Bengaluru :

    While liquor shops across the country are having to relocate in wake of the implementation of the Supreme Court order banning sale of liquor within 500 metres of national and state highways, a village in Kodagu on the Bengaluru -Mangaluru highway has decided not to allow relocation or reopening of vends.

    A decision against reopening and relocation of liquor vends was taken unanimously at a recent gram sabha meeting in Sampaje village bordering Kodagu and Dakshina Kannada districts.

    The village panchayat president, Balachandra Kalagi, raised the issue during the gram panchayat meeting and presented a written plea by villagers requesting the panchayat not to give `no objection certificate’ for shifting and reopening of closed bars and vends in Sampaje.

    More than 25 letters signed by various organizations in cluding Dharmasthala Gramabrivrdhi Sangha, Shradha centres and self-help groups have been submitted to the panchayat administration urging it to stop liquor sale in Sampaje, to which Kalagi and other office bearers -BR Sundara, Kumara Chidkaru, BA Ganapathi, Tirumala, SN Pushpavathi -have agreed to.

    The villagers have warned of an agitation if liquor shops are reopened.

    “The panchayat has decided to reject applications seeking NOC for relocation or reopening of liquor shops,” said Kalagi.

    He told TOI that the Sam paje village panchayat was among the four panchayats from Karnataka and 30,000 panchayats across the country to have received an award for its developmental efforts. The panchayat taps water flowing downhill and supplies it through a pipeline to its villages namely Pambechal, Chittegana, Kuntikana, Manyadka, Guddegadde, Arekalla and Kalyala.

    source: http://www.timesofindia.indiatimes.com / The Times of India / News> City News> Bangalore News> Civic Issues / TNN / July 06th, 2017

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    The wedding engagement of Rakshit Shetty and Rashmika Mandanna took place in Madikeri. The couple first on the sets of Kirik Party, which became a super hit at the box office last year. Rashmika is more than 10 years younger to Rakshit, who is in his 30s.

    Rakshit Shetty and Rashmika Mandanna got engaged

    Rakshit Shetty and Rashmika Mandanna got engaged

    Days after officially announcing their relationship, the new Sandalwood couple, Rakshit Shetty and Rashmika Mandanna got engaged in a grand ceremony on Monday at Virajpet in Madikeri, Karnataka. The couple took their relationship to next level by exchanging rings in front of more than 1,500 guests, including celebrities. The ceremony took place at Serenity Marriage Hall, which is owned by Rashmika’s father M Madan Mandanna.

    The wedding engagement of Rakshit and Rashmika happened in both Coastal and Kodava traditions and the guests were treated to Kodava and North Indian delicacies at the function. Even North Indian and Chinese items were on the menu, said reports.

    Rakshit and Rashmika met on the sets of Kirik Party, which became a super hit at the box office last year. While Rakshit had already made a mark in Kannada cinema at the time, the film marked Rashmika’s acting debut.

    Well, Rashmika revealed that it was not loved at first sight for her. She fell for Rakshit after becoming friends with him first. Rashmika is more than 10 years younger to Rakshit, who last month celebrated his 34th birthday.

    “Let’s do this. So blessed to have Rakshit Shetty in my life and thanks to Madhu,” Rashmika wrote on her Facebook page on her engagement day. “So sweet of you Rashmika Mandanna. In fact, I am the lucky one to have you in my life,” Rakshit tweeted.

    Last month, the couple announced that they have been dating each other and will soon get married. “After my relationship with Rashmika started making headlines in the media, I decided to talk to her parents. So the media paved the way to take our relationship to the next level,” Rakshit told in a lighter vein while talking to a local news channel.

    Days after officially announcing their relationship, the new Sandalwood couple, Rakshit Shetty and Rashmika Mandanna got engaged in a grand ceremony on Monday at Virajpet in Madikeri, Karnataka. The couple took their relationship to next level by exchanging rings in front of more than 1,500 guests, including celebrities. The ceremony took place at Serenity Marriage Hall, which is owned by Rashmika’s father M Madan Mandanna.

    The wedding engagement of Rakshit and Rashmika happened in both Coastal and Kodava traditions and the guests were treated to Kodava and North Indian delicacies at the function. Even North Indian and Chinese items were on the menu, said reports.

    Rakshit and Rashmika met on the sets of Kirik Party, which became a super hit at the box office last year. While Rakshit had already made a mark in Kannada cinema at the time, the film marked Rashmika’s acting debut.

    Well, Rashmika revealed that it was not loved at first sight for her. She fell for Rakshit after becoming friends with him first. Rashmika is more than 10 years younger to Rakshit, who last month celebrated his 34th birthday.

    “Let’s do this. So blessed to have Rakshit Shetty in my life and thanks to Madhu,” Rashmika wrote on her Facebook page on her engagement day. “So sweet of you Rashmika Mandanna. In fact, I am the lucky one to have you in my life,” Rakshit tweeted.

    Last month, the couple announced that they have been dating each other and will soon get married. “After my relationship with Rashmika started making headlines in the media, I decided to talk to her parents. So the media paved the way to take our relationship to the next level,” Rakshit told in a lighter vein while talking to a local news channel.

    source: http://www.indianexpress.com / The Indian Express / Home> Entertainment> Regional / by Express Web Desk/ Bengaluru / July 04th, 2017

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    A view of Chelavara Falls in Kodagu.

    A view of Chelavara Falls in Kodagu.

    Kodagu, the birthplace of River Cauvery, takes a new gushing life each monsoon. The district’s every corner comes alive with white streams that flow amidst the forest green. One such angel that falls from 100 feet above is Chelavara Falls in Virajpet taluk.

    Located 15 km from Virajpet town, Chelavara Falls is at Chelavara village, which is 5 km from Cheyyandane Main Road. Travelling on this road, one’s ears are enthralled with the gushing uproar of the falls from 2 km away! Hidden, yet heard amidst the luscious green forest, one has to trek down for about 500 metres on a stony path to witness this seraphic monsoon beauty.

    The first sight of the falls looks like a thick fog hitting the earth with thundering force. Flowing down atop a tortoise shaped rock, Chelavara Falls starts off its journey from Tadiandamol peak, takes its route as a small stream and reaches Chelavara as an angelic cascade. Coming face to face with the falls, the splashes and sprinkles from this gushing water can get one completely drenched in about a second.

    While the monsoons double up the beauty, it also transforms it to a dangerous spot. This angelic falls can turn out to be a beast if the beholder does not heed to the caution boards placed all around, advising people not to enter into the waters. The currents are highduring the monsoons and the place has witnessed many fatal incidents.

    Yet, monsoon is the best time to visit the falls that is to be enjoyed from a distance. Travellers can also hike around the area and savour the forest greenery.

    source: http://www.deccanherald.com / Deccan Herald / Home> Supplements> Spectrum / by Prajna GR / July 04th, 2017

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    July 3rd, 2017adminBusiness & Economy

    A convention of the elected members from Congress party from Dakshina Kannada and Kodagu districts will be held at Adyar Grounds in Mangaluru on July 7.

    B. Ramanath Rai, Minister in-charge of the district, told reporters here on Monday that Chief Minister Siddaramaiah and AICC General Secretary K.C. Venugopal will participate in the convention.

    Mr. Rai said elected members and those who were defeated in the elections will be called to the convention organised to work out ways to win all the legislative assembly seats in the two districts. Following the election of C. Harish Kumar as president of Dakshina Kannada Pradesh Congress Committee, Mr. Rai said there will be changes in the block level of the party in the district and have activists who will work 24×7 for the party in the coming months.

    In a ceremony held later, Mr. Kumar took charge of his new post.

    source: http://www.thehindu.com / The Hindu / Home> News> States> Karnataka / by Special Correspondent / Mangaluru – July 03rd, 2017

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